Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 20 April 2014

HURLING

Hurling can be traced back from about 1000AD to 1600AD where references have been made to a narrow caman (hurley) and a wooden ball. The game was generally played in the winter and associated with Christmas and the New Year. The ordnance survey parish memoirs of 1830 state that in Loughgiel the people played: "A sort of hurling, or caman playing, as it is called in the North, is still kept up here chiefly among the Catholics." Hurling was introduced in an organised way by James and John McAleese of Tully in 1904 with the assistance of Dan Dempsey of Belfast. They played friendly matches with Carey and Cushendun. In 1907 two teams from the parish entered competitions in North Antrim. One was called Tir-na-nog and the other team was named Dalriada. The present Loughgiel Shamrock Hurling club came into being about 1915.

Hurling can be traced back from about 1000AD to 1600AD where references have been made to a narrow caman (hurley) and a wooden ball. The game was generally played in the winter and associated with Christmas and the New Year. The ordnance survey parish memoirs of 1830 state that in Loughgiel the people played: "A sort of hurling, or caman playing, as it is called in the North, is still kept up here chiefly among the Catholics." Hurling was introduced in an organised way by James and John McAleese of Tully in 1904 with the assistance of Dan Dempsey of Belfast. They played friendly matches with Carey and Cushendun. In 1907 two teams from the parish entered competitions in North Antrim. One was called Tir-na-nog and the other team was named Dalriada. The present Loughgiel Shamrock Hurling club came into being about 1915.