Belfast Telegraph

Monday 22 September 2014

HURLING

Hurling can be traced back from about 1000AD to 1600AD where references have been made to a narrow caman (hurley) and a wooden ball. The game was generally played in the winter and associated with Christmas and the New Year. The ordnance survey parish memoirs of 1830 state that in Loughgiel the people played: "A sort of hurling, or caman playing, as it is called in the North, is still kept up here chiefly among the Catholics." Hurling was introduced in an organised way by James and John McAleese of Tully in 1904 with the assistance of Dan Dempsey of Belfast. They played friendly matches with Carey and Cushendun. In 1907 two teams from the parish entered competitions in North Antrim. One was called Tir-na-nog and the other team was named Dalriada. The present Loughgiel Shamrock Hurling club came into being about 1915.

Hurling can be traced back from about 1000AD to 1600AD where references have been made to a narrow caman (hurley) and a wooden ball. The game was generally played in the winter and associated with Christmas and the New Year. The ordnance survey parish memoirs of 1830 state that in Loughgiel the people played: "A sort of hurling, or caman playing, as it is called in the North, is still kept up here chiefly among the Catholics." Hurling was introduced in an organised way by James and John McAleese of Tully in 1904 with the assistance of Dan Dempsey of Belfast. They played friendly matches with Carey and Cushendun. In 1907 two teams from the parish entered competitions in North Antrim. One was called Tir-na-nog and the other team was named Dalriada. The present Loughgiel Shamrock Hurling club came into being about 1915.

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Comment

More

Company Profiles

More

Help & Advice

More

People on the move

More