Belfast Telegraph

Belfast's Value Cabs raises £125,000 for Northern Ireland Chest, Heart and Stroke

Value Cabs have raised over £125,000 for Northern Ireland Chest, Heart and Stroke charity.

The Belfast taxi firm raised the cash at a ball in the Europa Hotel, Belfast to celebrate its 20th anniversary.

An auction on the evening included a piece painted by cult artist Ben Mosley and trips to South Africa, Dubai, London and France.

Over 400 guests from the world of business and showbiz attended the ball, which was held in the Europa Hotel, Belfast in June this year.

With entertainment provided by comedians Tim McGarry and John Linehan, as well as undercover singing act Incognito, who surprised guests by wearing Value Cab’s driver uniforms, the evening was one of the highlights of Northern Ireland’s social calendar.

Christopher McCausland, MD at Value Cabs said: “I would like to thank everyone who supported our 20th anniversary ball and gave so very generously. We are delighted that the ball, which was held to mark a wonderful milestone for everyone at Value Cabs, was also used to raise funds for a charity that provides such vital services to people with chest, heart and stroke conditions. We are very pleased to present Northern Ireland Chest Heart and Stroke with a cheque for £125,000.”

Declan Cunnane, Chief Executive of NI Chest Heart and Stroke commented: “I would like to thank Value Cabs and all those who attended the ball for their incredible generosity.  Northern Ireland Chest Heart and Stroke delivers 48 essential care and support services to over 500 people each week. We provide cardiac, stroke and respiratory support to people living with these health conditions across Northern Ireland, as well as their families and carers. We are immensely grateful to Value Cabs for raising an unprecedented £125,000 and for their continued support to Northern Ireland Chest Heart and Stroke. This contribution can make a real and lasting difference to people’s lives.”

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