Belfast Telegraph

Wednesday 23 July 2014

Bana not interested in racing role

Eric Bana wouldn't want to be told he couldn't do driving stunts in a movie

Eric Bana has no desire to play a racing driver on the big screen - despite his passion for motors.

The Star Trek actor admitted that one reason he lives in Melbourne, instead of Hollywood, is because he can ride bikes in the Australian Outback.

He also made a documentary film - Love The Beast - about the 25-year history of his first car.

But asked about the possibility of ever playing a famous racing driver, the Aussie actor said: "I'd end up with a stunt man tapping me on the shoulder saying, 'You're not allowed to do this'.

"That doesn't interest me at all; I'd tell him where to go."

In his latest film, Deadfall, the Blackhawk Down star plays sociopath Addison, the older brother of Liza (Olivia Wilde).

Initially, Bana's agent thought that he would play the part of ex-boxer Jay (played by Charlie Hunnam), but it was the role of Addison that caught his eye.

"He just seemed more complicated. There were a few scenes that I immediately couldn't wait to do," he said.

"That's something you beg for as an actor - to read a script that you not only react to but immediately have ideas for."

:: Deadfall is released in cinemas on Friday, May 10.

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