Belfast Telegraph

Kutcher fires back at film critics

Ashton Kutcher has revealed that early criticism about his portrayal as Steve Jobs has pushed him to do the role justice.

The Two And A Half Men star tried to turn the scepticism he received when it was first announced that he would be playing the late Apple co-creator in the biopic Jobs into a positive.

"I think the early scepticism was actually really, really valuable. To all the people that were like hating it beforehand, it was like, 'F you! I'm going to show up and I'll show you what we've got," he told E! News.

The 35-year-old admitted that his wardrobe was even picked on initially, before shooting began.

"I went to get coffee and I had a black T-shirt and a pair of blue jeans on and somebody was like, 'Oh look, he's not even wearing the right Steve Jobs shoes and that's not the right shirt and that's not even a turtleneck'. I was getting blown up and criticised before we even started," he recalled.

Josh Gads stars as Steve's Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in the biographical drama, which is directed by Joshua Michael Stern. The film tells the story of Steve's rise to global fame, from different perspectives.

"It was our interpretation of events that we weren't in the room, we weren't there. We weren't sitting there when things happened," Ashton said.

Jobs, which premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, will open in US cinemas on August 16 with no UK release set.

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