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Seyfried in cannabis legal call

Published 12/07/2015

Amanda Seyfried said cannabis should be legalised
Amanda Seyfried said cannabis should be legalised

Mamma Mia! star Amanda Seyfried has backed the legalisation of cannabis, even though she does not use it herself.

The Hollywood star, who plays a bong-smoking lawyer in Seth MacFarlane's profane teddy bear sequel Ted 2, said the drug can be used responsibly and questioned why it is seen as worse than alcohol.

Seyfried, who played Sophie Sheridan in Mamma Mia!, told the Sunday Times she did not use the drug, saying it would be "the worst thing ever for me" because she suffers from anxiety attacks.

The 29-year-old Red Riding Hood and Lovelace star added: "But I think it's a wonderful thing, and lots of people use it responsibly, and it should be legal.

"I don't understand how people can die all the time from alcohol poisoning, yet pot is so stigmatised. They could have put a bong in every scene as far as I'm concerned."

Ted 2 is a follow up to 2012's original and sees Seyfried line up alongside Mark Wahlberg and the MacFarlane-voiced title character, a potty-mouthed, drink- and drug-taking, sex-obsessed, talking teddy bear.

Seyfried also hit out at selfie culture and social media in her interview.

The star, who has a million Instagram followers and 451,000 on Twitter, told the Sunday Times: "If you star in a show with a big, obsessive teen audience, you'll get millions of followers, but no-one else will have heard of you. So it doesn't translate into pop culture.

"But for people in other areas of the industry, yes, it's seen as validation. It's so depressing."

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