Belfast Telegraph

Tuesday 26 May 2015

Sheen: I took steroids for film

Charlie Sheen has revealed how he took steroids for his role in the 1989 movie Major League
Charlie Sheen has revealed how he took steroids for his role in the 1989 movie Major League

Charlie Sheen has admitted taking steroids to star as a baseball player in a movie.

The US star - who was fired from hit TV show Two And A Half Men following a public meltdown last year - told Playboy magazine that he took the performance-enhancing drugs for three months to help boost his pitching skills for 1989's Major League.

He said: "I wanted to put a little zip on my fastball. I didn't want to look like I was lily-arming it up there. I was always a hit-the-spots, low-zone pitcher. But my character, Ricky Vaughn, is a flamethrower. With steroids I went from a modest 78 mph to a decent 85, which on film can be made to look in the 90s."

But the 46-year-old confessed there was a downside.

He revealed: "I got injured a lot afterward. Steroids build your muscles, but they don't build your tendons or ligaments. Once you start altering your body's blueprint, things start falling apart. Some players take steroids, and two years later, after they've broken records, suddenly they have back problems, shoulder problems, arm problems. They're out of the game for good."

Charlie added that when you are using steroids "you're pissed all day long".

"About nothing," he added. "You just wake up and you're f*****g mad."

The Anger Management star continued: "But I had a trainer who was really smart. He'd been a defensive lineman in the National Football League. He knew enough guys who did steroids, and he knew enough doctors. I did steroids for only three months, and I never did them again. If there's a safe way to do steroids, we tried."

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Gemini:

Don't bring your work home with you. Although you're wonderfully efficient in your job, you require different skills when dealing with friends and family. Be generous with your praise, resources and encouragement. Someone who is struggling needs moral support. Giving a lecture about personal responsibility will not help. Instead, lend a sympathetic ear. Ask questions. Picture things from the other person's point of view. A receptive attitude will strengthen your relationship.More