Belfast Telegraph

Thursday 28 May 2015

Bugg: Success will change my music

Jake Bugg says his next album is unlikely to be so gritty
Jake Bugg says his next album is unlikely to be so gritty

Jake Bugg has admitted his success has affected his music, and his next album will not be as gritty as the first.

The 19-year-old Brit Award nominee grew up in Nottingham's notorious Clifton council estate and the music on his bluesy eponymous debut album reflected some of the things he had witnessed.

But Jake told Absolute Radio: "On a second record for me to sing about drinking and smoking and stabbings in car parks, you know, would be very dishonest because I haven't experienced that in the last year.

"I've had a lot of amazing opportunities that where I come from, a lot of people wouldn't get, so I think maybe there's something in giving people an insight into what's been going on."

The Two Fingers singer - who supported the Rolling Stones in Hyde Park at the weekend - confessed he has changed a lot since his music career took off.

Jake said: "I have changed, I've learnt a lot and I think you are going to change as a person but I hope I can only change into a better one."

You can watch the full Jake Bugg interview at www.absoluteradio.co.uk.

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