Belfast Telegraph

Morcheeba chose more upbeat sound

Morcheeba star Ross Godfrey has admitted he wasn't as keen on some of the tracks on the band's new album as he is on others - because he had less influence on the record than he usually does.

The British band, who formed in 1995, released their eighth album, Head Up High, in October.

Ross's brother Paul, who is also in the three-piece band, produced the record this time and Ross said that his decision to give the record a more upbeat sound was "a nice change".

He said: "There are some great tracks on the album, some I don't like so much, but I'm happy."

Asked why he didn't like certain tracks, he said: "It was a shared collaboration between all three of us, and my brother (Paul) took the reins as a producer this time, choosing track-listing and doing all the mixing.

"I had less influence over how this record sounds than I normally do, because I was in the middle of moving back to London from Los Angeles, and six months ago I had a baby daughter, so I had a lot on my plate.

"It was good to be able to let Paul and (singer) Skye (Edwards) share the load. It's very refreshing, taking it easy."

He added: "It wasn't difficult to hand things over to him (Paul) because he had such a clear idea of what he wanted to do."

Ross said that he "missed the British weather" while living in LA.

"I'd been in LA for five or six years doing music for films and things, and I'd just got my green card to stay there. But then suddenly, once I had it, I realised I didn't want it.

"The UK is an amazing place... I miss the sense of humour in the UK, the genuine people, and figured that the US wasn't in my long-term plans... I didn't want my children to grow up in America. I sent back my green card with note saying 'Thanks but no thanks'."

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Popular

From Belfast Telegraph