Belfast Telegraph

Wednesday 23 July 2014

War Child to receive Brits gong

Sir Paul McCartney is a long-standing supporter of War Child, which is to be given a special Brit award

War Child, the charity, will be receiving a Special Recognition Award at next year's Brits.

The Outstanding Contribution gong - won by Blur at this year's ceremony - is being dropped at the 2013 bash to present the first Special Recognition Award instead.

War Child, which marks its 20th anniversary next year, has been supported by stars from David Bowie to the late Amy Winehouse and helps children living in war zones.

Ex-Beatle Sir Paul McCartney said: "A lot of people say that music cannot change the world. I think it really can make a difference.

"Music can make people aware, put the issue into focus and shine a spotlight on the bad stuff. It also eats away at the horrors and alleviates some of the pain by raising the money to help these children.

"I have been supporting War Child since 1995. Their work saves lives. I urge everyone to support War Child."

Brits Chairman David Joseph said: "For two decades now, War Child has worked with artists to raise funds and awareness to help children whose lives have been torn apart by war.

"The Brits are proud to give recognition for their vital work as well as saying thank you to all the artists who have given their time, help and energy to something so important."

This is not the first time a non-music name has received a Brit Award. In 1996, the Freddie Mercury Award was given to War Child for the Help charity album, featuring the likes of Sir Paul, Radiohead, Blur, Oasis, and The Stone Roses. In 1999, the same award was collected by boxer Muhammad Ali for the Jubilee 2000 campaign on third world debt.

The Brits take place on February 20 at The O2 arena, hosted once again by James Corden.

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Leo:

Rebelling against outmoded conventions is liberating. Usually, you're comfortable with tradition. In this situation, you realise the old ways are a liability. Stuffy rules and regulations are stopping a large amount of people from accessing resources and services. It's up to you to sound the alarm. When the powers that be realise you mean business, they'll work hard to update the regulations. You'll make several new friends after getting involved with this cause.More