Belfast Telegraph

Friday 29 August 2014

World-class Brodsky Quartet alliance hits all the right notes

Collaborations are a rarity in classical composition: most pieces are written by a single person.

Not so Trees, Walls, Cities, a cycle of new songs by eight composers with interlocking musical material by Nigel Osborne.

Scored for soprano and string quartet, the piece is unified by themes of conflict and resolution, as it travels to the diverse locations of Derry-Londonderry, Vienna and Nicosia.

Inevitably the songs differ stylistically, but there are strong images of deracination, loss and rebirth and the soaring vocalism of soprano Lore Lixenberg is a binding element.

For the Elgar Piano Quintet the Brodskys were joined by Derry-born pianist Cathal Breslin, who has done an outstanding job curating this year's Walled City Music Festival.

A night of chamber music of the highest quality.

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Your Horoscopes by Russell Grant

Virgo:

A close relationship could reach a rocky patch. Resist the urge to emotionally withdraw from your loved one. Be willing to address the issues that have been pulling you apart. You could hear some painful things about your behaviour. Instead of getting defensive, be open to changing for the sake of your relationship. Think back to a time when someone you loved worked hard to gain your affection and approval. Pattern your attitude after theirs. Being flexible is more important than being right.More