Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

Video: Move over Taylor Swift and Johnny Cash, Frostbit Boy McSorley is new star of country music

By Lesley Houston

Published 14/01/2016

Ruairi McSorley in another scene from his video for The Girl For Me
Ruairi McSorley in another scene from his video for The Girl For Me
Ruairi McSorley in scenes from his video, The Girl For Me
Another scene from The Girl For Me
'Frostbit Boy'

Ruairi McSorley - better known as 'Frostbit Boy' - has released a tongue-in-cheek song for charity which has soared to number two on iTunes' UK country music charts.

The Co Londonderry lad, who hit the headlines last January after giving a wry interview on TV about the bad weather, is now riding high above such country music luminaries as Taylor Swift, the late Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton.

And whether his fans view The Girl For Me as a parody or a pastiche, the song has being raising funds for a worthy cause.

The song was released last month as part of the NiStars Songs For Anna Charity Album, which was compiled for local girl Anna Guest, who was diagnosed with a brain tumour just after her 14th birthday.

Loveable culchie Ruairi became an internet sensation last year when the 18-year-old schoolboy gave his unique view on the weather to UTV Live.

When interviewed about the snow piling up around his home in the picturesque Sperrins, he famously remarked: "Oh God, you wouldn't be long getting frostbit."

The clip went viral and has been viewed millions of times online.

In his new video, which features risqué scenes of him with an older woman - both in bed and on the toilet - Ruairi's comic lyrics include lines like: "I like a classy lassie but she has to drive a Massey... Ferguson."

In his trademark, thick, guttural Derry accent, Ruairi continues in a less than enlightened vein about looking for a woman who can "iron those clothes with your eyes closed".

But it's all for a good laugh and a good cause, said country music presenter Lynette Fay.

She had the country boy himself in her Radio Ulster studio last Saturday night for the single's official release.

"I got wind that he was recording something so I got hold of him," she said.

"We were lapping round the studio when I played it first."

She revealed that on his way from the bus station to the BBC studios at Ormeau Avenue for the debut airing, he was stopped five times by fans who asked him to join them for some selfies. Lynette said the teenager was "just being himself" in a manner that "endears himself to a lot people".

"He's a country boy and it's all just a bit of craic," she said.

"I think he realised last year that he was on to something and he was just going to see what was the next step and how far he could progress with it.

"He's just going for it, and I think everybody will see the bright side of it.

"And if you're doing something for a good cause, well then that's even better."

The presenter said Ruairi - who "views himself as a bit of a comedian" - was currently enjoying gigs at country music venues across Northern Ireland and the Republic. She added he had also been collaborating with Claudy singer Richie Remo.

Belfast Telegraph

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting?

Read More

From Belfast Telegraph