Belfast Telegraph

Andy Serkis 'frustrated' by awards show snubs

The star is convinced some people still don't understand how much work goes into using the top technology.

British actor Andy Serkis is dismayed Hollywood awards show officials have continually failed to recognise the work of stars using motion-capture technology to bring non-human characters to life onscreen.

The 53-year-old has become a master at the high-tech craft after starring as Gollum in The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy and 2012's The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, as well as in 2005's King Kong and 2015's Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

He recently reprised his role as ape leader Caesar for the new War for the Planet of the Apes movie, the third instalment in the rebooted franchise series, in which he has featured since 2011's Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Serkis' motion-capture work, which requires actors to wear special camera headsets, bodysuits, and facial marks to capture their every expression, has long been praised by his colleagues, but the industry adulation has failed to transform into awards season recognition - and Andy wants that to change once and for all.

Asked if he is annoyed by the lack of consideration, he tells TheWrap.com, "It is frustrating, actually. Some awards bodies do recognise it and some haven't yet. But it is crazily Luddite (old-fashioned) and backward-thinking to not recognise what we do as acting.

"You do not approach these roles in any other way than you would a live-action character," he continues. "You're going through exactly the same process: you're acting with other actors, you're delivering a performance..."

Serkis is particularly peeved when film fans fail to understand the lengths he has to go to to really transform himself for specific characters.

"When people say to me, 'Do you do the voice of Gollum?' or 'Do you do the voice of Caesar?' it's like, 'Are you kidding me?,'" he says. "We're on the set for months playing these roles - it's not like we stroll into a voice booth for a couple of hours and talk into a microphone while someone video references us. It's a totally different method of work... And we're still having the conversation."

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