Belfast Telegraph

Tuesday 23 December 2014

Clarkson gets on bike for charity

Jeremy Clarkson is support the Hero Ride. Picture credit: Roger Kelly/PA Wire
Jeremy Clarkson is support the Hero Ride. Picture credit: Roger Kelly/PA Wire

Jeremy Clarkson put aside his aversion to bicycles as he lent his support to the latest Help for Heroes fundraiser.

The Top Gear presenter, who once described cycles as "silly Victorian distractions" and is known for his low opinion of their users, got to grips with a handbike and even encouraged people to hit the road on their bikes to back the event.

Jeremy was visiting the Tedworth House recovery centre, in Tidworth, Wiltshire, to meet troops affected by life-changing injuries and to lend his support to the charity's latest initiative.

He met triple amputee Corporal Josh Boggi and double amputee Staff Sergeant Steve Arnold, who are both taking part in Hero Ride.

Jeremy, who is patron of Help for Heroes, climbed into a handbike and as he tried to turn the hand cranks, he told the two servicemen: "Do you know what's happened? It's really embarrassing... my stomach is so big... I can't actually... look."

Cpl Boggi and Staff Sgt Arnold explained to the star how the hand cranks worked, and he replied: "Not if you're fat."

Clarkson got to grips with the handbike and as he rode around the gardens at Tedworth House, he discussed the forthcoming Hero Ride with Staff Sgt Arnold and jokingly told the soldier: "To be honest with you, the lack of legs makes it easier."

Hero Ride takes place on June 2 and will see cyclists from all corners of the country stage fundraising bike rides.

Organisers are hoping to raise more than £2 million for Help for Heroes.

Jeremy said: "I'd like to encourage as many of the great British public as possible to take to their bikes and fundraise".

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Your Horoscopes by Russell Grant

Capricorn:

A pragmatist like you prefers to rely on facts and figure to make decisions. The hard data you want will not be available, forcing you to rely on your intuition. You must get in touch with your instincts. Tune in to your body's signals. Your stomach will tell you which direction to take. When it gives a painful twinge, you should change paths. When it flutters with excitement, you should move forward. This will be a surprisingly accurate barometer. Don't disparage it.More