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DEA officials called to help with Prince's case

Published 28/04/2016


A new government agency is getting involved in the inquiry surrounding Prince's demise.

Minnesota authorities have called upon officials from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to assist with the investigation into Prince's death after prescription painkillers were reportedly found in his possession.

The Purple Rain star passed away at his Paisley Park studios in Chanhassen on 21 April (16), and although an autopsy performed on Friday (22Apr16) failed to throw up an immediate cause of death, new reports suggest the superstar may have been battling an issue with painkillers he was taking for an ongoing hip injury in the days before his passing.

Federal law enforcement officials told NBC News on Wednesday (27Apr16) that the county sheriff has asked for assistance from DEA bosses, after prescription painkillers were found in his possession when he died.

The DEA will help determine where the medications were obtained and what prescriptions he had, both common checks performed by the government officials in death investigations.

Authorities have yet to say what role, if any, the medication may have played in his death.

Prince's remains were cremated on Saturday (23Apr16), shortly before the 57-year-old was remembered in a private service at Paisley Park, attended by his family and close friends, including ex-fiancee Sheila E, bass player Larry Graham, and his ex-wife Mayte Garcia.

In other news, a Minnesota judge has placed bank bosses in charge of Prince's estate after determining the superstar died without a will.

The music icon's sister, Tyka Nelson, filed papers on Tuesday (26Apr16) to open a probate case, confirming reports suggesting her brother passed without outlining his final wishes.

She asked a state judge to appoint her as a "special administrator", and insisted she would be an heir to her brother's fortune, while their five half-siblings were potential beneficiaries too.

Tyka requested executives at the Bremer Trust, National Association, serve as the official administrators of Prince's estate, revealing bankers had provided financial services to Prince for years.

The case went before a judge on Wednesday morning (27Apr16), when the court official ruled Prince did not leave a will, and therefore his fortune will be split evenly between his heirs, as per state law.

The judge also approved Tyka's request to place Bremer Trust chiefs in charge of managing the musician's assets, which have reportedly been valued at less than $150 million (£104 million), according to

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