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Jake Gyllenhaal and Sean Hayes do karaoke at the Tonys

Published 13/06/2016

Jake Gyllenhaal
Jake Gyllenhaal

Jake showed off his hidden singing talent at the star-studded event alongside James Corden.

Jake Gyllenhaal and Sean Hayes entertained the audience with a burst of karaoke at the 2016 Tony Awards on Sunday (12Jun16).

The Nightcrawler actor stunned the star-studded crowd after being roped into a performance of Disney song A Whole New World during the commercial break at the show at the Beacon Theatre on Sunday (12Jun16) in New York City.

Host James Corden previously shared he wanted celebrity attendees to sing during the breaks at the show and Jake, accompanied by Will & Grace star Sean Hayes, was one of a few brave stars to take up the challenge.

Actor and musical theatre star Sean posted a video of himself with Jake on Facebook with the caption: “During commercial breaks at The Tony’s tonight, the amazingly brilliant James Corden started up a Broadway-themed ‘commercial karaoke’. He asked for volunteers. Jake Gyllenhaal & I were happy to oblige with our rendition of ‘A Whole New World’ from ALADDIN. #TheTonyAwards."

Jake had to read the lyric sheet for most of the song, but he clearly knew the melody, and the video showed the actor in fine voice as he sung the movie tune written by Tim Rice and Alan Menken.

A Whole New World featured on the Aladdin soundtrack as Aladdin's theme, and was originally performed by Peabo Bryson and Regina Belle. A single version of the song reached number one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 music chart in 1993.

Jake looked dapper in a black Salvatore Ferragamo suit, and also presented the award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play award to Jayne Houdyshell for her work in The Humans.

While on stage, he paid tribute to Hillary Clinton who recently became the Democratic presumptive presidential nominee, saying: "As Hillary Clinton showed us this week, women can do anything."

Sunday evening's Tony Awards were dedicated to those affected by the mass shooting in a nightclub in Orlando, Florida, that saw at least 50 people killed.

Broadway hit Hamilton dropped the use of muskets from its performance instead using pantomime to represent warfare during an 18th-century battle scene in the song Yorktown, reported editors at the New York Times.

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