Belfast Telegraph

Wednesday 16 April 2014

Michael Douglas regrets length of first marriage

Michael Douglas

Michael Douglas thinks his marriage to first wife Diandra should have come to an end ten years earlier than it did.

The actor was hitched to Diandra Luker from 1977 to 2000, although they separated in 1995.

However he felt the need to keep the relationship going as long as possible.

“I know I’m going to get into trouble here. I have nothing against her and in fact I’m very fond of my first wife. But we should have ended that marriage eight or ten years earlier,” he told British newspaper the Daily Mirror.

“It took me too long to realise that if you go to a marriage counsellor to resolve problems, it’s in his interest to keep the marriage going.

“Because if I end the marriage he’s got no business. I think Diandra would probably say the same thing. That’s the only clear regret that I have.”

The 68-year-old is now married to Catherine Zeta-Jones and the couple have children Dylan, 12, and Carys, 10, together.

He is happy with Chicago star Catherine and the actor admits it takes a lot of effort to maintain the strength of their relationship.

“Love is an extraordinary feeling that comes from the bottom of your soul, but has to be nurtured, you know,” he continued.

“The thing I’ve learned about getting older is you can’t take love for granted. You protect it, nurture it and it grows and after one’s initial, physical emotional aspects, it becomes deeper.”

His son Cameron with Diandra was recently jailed for drug offences.

Michael’s 45-year career has seen him recently overcome a battle with stage-four throat cancer. He also entered rehab in the 1990s for what he said was an alcohol problem but was thought to be a sex addiction.

Despite drinking and smoking he maintains that the length of his first legal union is still his biggest regret.

© Cover Media

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Aries:

You will have to defer to others, which makes you anxious. There's never any problem when you're in control. You know how to act quickly and decisively. When others are at the helm, progress grinds to a halt. People deliberate endlessly over simple matters. Instead of putting pressure on the person in charge, make a strategic retreat. If you act like you don't care about the outcome of a situation, they won't be paralysed with uncertainty. You have a tendency to make people nervous.More