Belfast Telegraph

Tuesday 23 December 2014

Robin Gibb's deathbed tribute to twin brother

Robin Gibb
Robin Gibb

Robin Gibb paid tribute to his late twin brother Maurice Gibb just before he died, it is reported.

The Bee Gees star passed away on Sunday at the age of 62 after a battle with liver cancer which had spread to his colon.

Maurice died back in 2003 due to complications from a twisted intestine but family sources told Britain's Daily Mirror that Robin was thinking about him in his last moments.

"I wish Mo was here," he said to family at his bedside. "I can't believe he is gone."

Insiders told the publication that Robin never moaned about his illness even as he drifted in and out of a coma.

"Robin was incredible to the end," the source said. "We all knew he was seriously unwell, but his strength of character meant he never once mentioned the possibility he might not make it.

"Instead he talked constantly about touring again, working with his brother Barry, and about how much he missed Maurice, or Mo as he called him.

"It was very moving to hear him speak so lovingly of his twin brother - as though he had never quite accepted that he had gone and still felt the same amazing connection between the two of them that they'd always had."

© Cover Media

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Nightlife Galleries

More

Latest Entertainment News

Latest Music News

Latest Film & TV News

Latest Eating Out News

Horoscopes

Your Horoscopes by Russell Grant

Capricorn:

A pragmatist like you prefers to rely on facts and figure to make decisions. The hard data you want will not be available, forcing you to rely on your intuition. You must get in touch with your instincts. Tune in to your body's signals. Your stomach will tell you which direction to take. When it gives a painful twinge, you should change paths. When it flutters with excitement, you should move forward. This will be a surprisingly accurate barometer. Don't disparage it.More