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Sherlock co-creator references Bake Off scandal at Emmy Awards

Published 19/09/2016

Steven Moffat
Steven Moffat

Sherlock's Steven Moffat poked fun at the scandal surrounding BBC losing The Great British Bake Off at the Emmy Awards on Sunday night (18Sep16).

The scandal surrounding The Great British Bake Off's upcoming move to Channel 4 has spread across the pond.

The Emmy Awards were held in Los Angeles on Sunday night (18Sep16), honouring the shows that kept viewers entertained and on the edge of their seats over the past 12 months.

But when Sherlock co-creator Steven Moffat took to the stage to accept his gong for Outstanding Television Movie for Sherlock's The Abominable Bride, he couldn't resist mentioning the controversy stemming from the BBC losing their much-loved baking show.

"Thank you to the BBC who we love above all bakery," Moffat teased, before adding to the somewhat bemused audience: "British people will get that!"

It was announced last week (12Sep16) that the programme, which sees a host of amateur bakers competing for the coveted winner's spot, will be moving to Channel 4 after the current series finishes.

Following the shock news, which came after lengthy discussions between the show's makers Love Productions and the BBC, hosts Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins broke the news to fans that they won't be making the move to Channel 4.

"We made no secret of our desire for the show to remain where it was... we're not going with the dough," they said in a joint statement.

Judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry have yet to publicly announce whether they will be moving to Channel 4, but domestic goddess Mary in particular has been vocal in the past about her desire to stay with the BBC.

However, it has been claimed that Channel 4 has offered both Mary and Paul a deal which would see them net between £300,000 and £350,000 per series.

The BBC are apparently less than willing to let the duo go, though, with the Daily Mirror reporting they have responded with their own "golden handcuffs" deal, which would mean Mary and Paul could only present shows created by BBC.

"It’s turning into a bitter turf war between rival TV stations," a source told the publication.

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