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Teens await T in the Park's arrival

Published 07/07/2015

T in the Park opens at the Strathallan Castle estate in Perthshire on Friday
T in the Park opens at the Strathallan Castle estate in Perthshire on Friday

Teenagers Jess and Liam Roberts say it will be "surreal" to see some of the biggest names in music perform on their doorstep as T in the Park makes its historic move.

Scotland's largest music festival opens at the Strathallan Castle estate in Perthshire on Friday after 18 years at nearby Balado.

Kasabian, Avicii, Sam Smith and Mark Ronson are on this year's line-up as organisers hope for a smooth transition to the festival's new home near Auchterarder.

The estate is owned by the Roberts family and Jess, 17, and Liam, 19, say they cannot wait to see the first revellers arrive when the campsite opens at 3pm on Thursday.

School-leaver Jess said: "It's going to be really surreal. My family got contacted about two years ago now, and soon we'll be seeing all the campers arrive. I'm really excited, I can't wait."

Glasgow University student Liam said: "Having been around the site for the last three or four weeks, and now seeing the fences go up and the stages being built, it's starting to hit home how surreal it will be to have T in the Park so close.

"Thursday will be great, seeing everyone come in and choose their spots. It's going to be great, I'm really looking forward to it."

Strathallan estate has been in the Roberts family since 1910 and is currently co-owned by Jess and Liam's parents Jamie and Debs and their aunt and neighbour, Anna Roberts.

Organisers DF Concerts struck a deal to shift the 2015 festival following health and safety concerns about an underground oil pipeline at Balado, Kinross-shire.

Local councillors approved the plan in May despite opposition from some residents and environmental groups who expressed concerns for ospreys at Strathallan.

The Roberts family say staging the event will allow improvements to be made to the estate, which dates back to the 13th century. They also believe it will give tourism and businesses in the area a boost.

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