Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 20 April 2014

The Odd Couple's Klugman dies at 90

Quincy actor Jack Klugman has died at the age of 90

Jack Klugman, the prolific, craggy-faced character actor and regular guy who was loved by millions as the crime-fighting coroner in Quincy, ME, has died, a son said. He was 90.

Klugman, who lost his voice to throat cancer in the 1980s and trained himself to speak again, died with his wife at his side.

"He had a great life and he enjoyed every moment of it and he would encourage others to do the same," son Adam Klugman said.

Jack Klugman apparently died suddenly, and family members were not sure of the exact cause.

Never anyone's idea of a matinee idol, Klugman remained a popular star for decades simply by playing a gruff but down-to-earth guy, his tie stained and a little loose, a cigar in hand during the days when smoking was permitted.

He was a city actor ideal for The Odd Couple, which ran from 1970 to 1975 and was based on Neil Simon's play about mismatched roommates, divorced New Yorkers who end up living together.

The show teamed Klugman - the sloppy sports writer Oscar Madison - and Tony Randall - the fussy photographer Felix Unger - in the roles played by Walter Matthau and Art Carney on Broadway and Matthau and Jack Lemmon in the 1968 film.

Klugman had already had a taste of the show when he replaced Matthau on Broadway, and he learned to roll with the quick-thinking Randall. "There's nobody better to improvise with than Tony," Klugman said. "A script might say, 'Oscar teaches Felix football'. There would be four blank pages. He would provoke me into reacting to what he did. Mine was the easy part."

They were the best of friends in real life. When Randall died in 2004 at age 84, Klugman told CNN: "A world without Tony Randall is a world that I cannot recognise."

In Quincy, ME, which ran from 1976 to 1983, Klugman played an idealistic, tough-minded medical examiner who tussled with his boss by uncovering evidence of murder in cases where others saw natural causes. "Everybody said, 'Quincy'll never be a hit.' I said, 'You guys are wrong. He's two heroes in one, a cop and a doctor,'" he said in a 1987 interview.

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