Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 20 April 2014

Visual Art 11/09/09

Bagging The Turf by Charles McAuley

In these difficult times the art galleries, like everyone else, are feeling the pinch with very few buyers about.

People who want to buy either want something at a fairly low price or want to pay big money for an investment. The bottom has more or less fallen out of the Irish art market with works by some very well known painters now fetching around half the prices of two years ago.

With things so slow all over the country, a number of private collectors (and some galleries) have been forced to sell art works to survive financially and, with few buyers, prices tend to be low.

What is fairly certain is that, if you have some money, now is the time to buy, provided that you can wait some time to recoup the benefit of your investment.

However, the Taylor Gallery at 471 Lisburn Road, Belfast, still has, as well as its Irish art, a great collection of international art — with only a small amount of it on view, so ask if you are interested. John Taylor always loves to chat about art and he might even offer you a cup of his very good coffee!

On the walls I saw several Damien Hirsts, a couple of Andy Warhols (of which he has quite a few), a little landscape by Hans Iten and a Roy Lichtenstein. Although not on the walls at the moment, I know that he holds in store works by artists like Francis Bacon, William Conor and Paul Henry.

If a great selection of artists is what you want to see then the Taylor is definitely the place for you. The gallery has everything from Dan O’Neill and Sir John Lavery to Charles McAuley and James McIntyre or the more up and coming Cora Harrington, Fred Yeats or Trish Wylie.

Yeats has a particularly quirky, naive, style, with childlike figures, bright colours and a very individual perspective.

elizabethobaird@googlemail.com

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