belfasttelegraph

Tuesday 30 September 2014

The real Atlantis? Megacities under threat from land subsidence

Venice, flooded in November 2013. Human-driven subsidence has stopped but the ground level is still falling thanks to natural factors.
Venice, flooded in November 2013. Human-driven subsidence has stopped but the ground level is still falling thanks to natural factors.
Tokyo.
The centre of the most populous metropolitan area of the world (home to more than 36 million), Tokyo has struggled with subsidence for decades. Groundwater extraction peaked in the 1970s and subsidence was bought down through restrictions to a rate 1cm a year in the early 2000s.
Tokyo. The centre of the most populous metropolitan area of the world (home to more than 36 million), Tokyo has struggled with subsidence for decades. Groundwater extraction peaked in the 1970s and subsidence was bought down through restrictions to a rate 1cm a year in the early 2000s.
Bangkok.
Land subsidence has affected the capital of Thailand for more than 35 years, with the ground's soft thick clay only exacerbating the threat from flooding.
Bangkok. Land subsidence has affected the capital of Thailand for more than 35 years, with the ground's soft thick clay only exacerbating the threat from flooding.

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published earlier this month identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

Latest Galleries

Latest Gallereis