Belfast Telegraph

Saturday 29 November 2014

Revealed: 100 first impressions of Titanic Belfast

The Titanic Ship 401 left Belfast on the 2nd April 100 years ago and to mark this centenary The Titanic Foundation with Titanic Belfast launched 401 balloons into the air with the help of pupils from Victoria College, RBAI and Methody.
The Titanic Ship 401 left Belfast on the 2nd April 100 years ago and to mark this centenary The Titanic Foundation with Titanic Belfast launched 401 balloons into the air with the help of pupils from Victoria College, RBAI and Methody.
Cadhan and Canice McDaid and Jack Dunne
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
Titanic Building Belfast 2nd Day Open - 1 April 2012Sam and Hanna Irwin
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
itanic Building Belfast 2nd Day Open - 1 April 2012 Aideen O'Shaughnessy with her children Diarmuid and Niall
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
Jenna Scofield (left) and Roberta Sitlington dressed as 'yardmen' to take part in the 'yardmen walk'at Titanic Belast to raise funds for bowel cancer awareness
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
Titanic Building Belfast 2nd Day Open - 1 April 2012
Titanic Building Belfast 2nd Day Open - 1 April 2012 Organisers prepare for the 'Yardmen Walk and Cycle' being held at Titanic yesterdayto raise funds for bowel cancer awareness
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
Steven Patterson with daughter Anna and Ron Moore with daughter Rebecca (pink waistcoat)
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
31.03.12. PICTURE BY DAVID FITZGERALDThe opening of the Titanic Signature Building on Saturday 31st March. People queued on Saturday Morning to see the building.
31.03.12. PICTURE BY DAVID FITZGERALDThe opening of the Titanic Signature Building on Saturday 31st March. People queued on Saturday Morning to see the building.
Odyssey cinemas guests waiting for the curtain to go up at the exclusive preview screening of Titanic 3D
31.03.12. PICTURE BY DAVID FITZGERALDThe opening of the Titanic Signature Building on Saturday 31st March. People queued on Saturday Morning to see the building.
31.03.12. PICTURE BY DAVID FITZGERALDThe opening of the Titanic Signature Building on Saturday 31st March. People queued on Saturday Morning to see the building. The Architect, Eric R Kuhne
Belfast Lord Mayor Niall O Donnghaile speaks at the opening of Titanic Belfast, the world's largest Titanic-themed attraction in the old shipyard at Harland and Wolff, where the doomed liner was built
The opening of the new Titanic Belfast tourism project
The opening of the new Titanic Belfast tourism project
Crowds of tourists wait for the opening of the new Titanic Belfast tourism project
Crowds at the opening of the new Titanic Belfast tourism project
Titanic 100th anniversaryUlster Youth Orchestra at the opening of the new Titanic Belfast tourism project
First minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin Mcguinness open the new Titanic Belfast tourism project to the public
Guests dressed for the occasion arrive for the official opening of Belfast's impressive new tourist attraction, the 100-million pound ($160 million, euro120 million) Titanic Belfast visitor center, which offers a loving portrait of the excitement, ambition and opulence surrounding the doomed trans-Atlantic liner in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Saturday, March, 31, 2012 (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
First Minister Peter Robinson with Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness as they pose with rivet hammers in the new Titanic Belfast, the world's largest Titanic-themed attraction that was officially opened today in the old shipyard at Harland and Wolff, where the doomed liner was built
(left to right) First Minister Peter Robinson with Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness, Belfast Titanic CEO Tim Husband and 105yr old Cyril Quigley, who watched the Titanic being launched as a young child in 1911, in the Titanic Belfast, the world's largest Titanic-themed attraction that was officially opened today in the old shipyard at Harland and Wolff, where the doomed liner was built
First Minister Peter Robinson with Belfast Titanic CEO Tim Husband meets 105 year old Cyril Quigley who watched the Titanic being launched as a young child in 1911 in the Titanic Belfast, the world's largest Titanic-themed attraction that was officially opened today in the old shipyard at Harland and Wolff, where the doomed liner was built
Eric Kuhne from CivicArts in London the architect behind the new Titanic Belfast visitor centre strikes a pose outside the guilding, the world's largest Titanic-themed attraction that was officially opened today in the old shipyard at Harland and Wolff, where the doomed liner was built
Women in period costumes outside the front of the new Titanic Belfast the world's largest Titanic-themed attraction that was officially opened today in the old shipyard at Harland and Wolff, where the doomed liner was built
Entrance to the Titanic Belfast Experience
The new Titanic House Vistor centre lights up the skyline in the Titanic quarter, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Sunday, March, 25, 2012. The £100 million (119.5 million euros; $158 million dollars) building is now finished and will open to the public on March 31. The world's biggest Titanic visitor attraction is to open in its Belfast birthplace later this month and it is 100 years to the day since the doomed ocean liner was completed in the same shipyard, Harland and Wolff. Northern Ireland hopes the eye-catching building will boost the tourism economy. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A sculpture entitled 'Titancia' marks the entrance to the Titanic Belfast Experience on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A sculpture entitled 'Titancia' marks the entrance to the Titanic Belfast Experience on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A giant steel name plate marks the entrance to the Titanic Belfast Experience on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: The recently completed Titanic Belfast Experience building is prepared for opening on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. The Titanic Staircase
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31st March.
A video recreation of the Titanic
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31st March.
Interactive pictures and computers in Titanic Gallery 3
A man looking at the interactive window which shows how the area the Titanic was built in looked before compared to how it looks now.
A slow rollercoaster showing old and reconstructed videos of how the Titanic was built
The entrance to the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March.
A man looks at an interactive map of the shipyard in which the Titanic was built.
Screens showing footage of life in Belfast at the time the Titanic was being built.
Aisling Dinsmore looks at the old Linen samples in Gallery 1 of Titanic Belfast
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. Linenopolis, Gallery 1.
The Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March.
Tthe Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31st March.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. Johnny Quinn (4) looking at windows in the first gallery.
One of the real lifeboats from the Titanic.
One of the lifeboats from the Titanic.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. Three screens giving visitors a virtual tour of inside the Titanic.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. A model of the Titanic.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. Kalista McErlane looks up at a painting of the Titanic.
Chains similar to those used on the Titanic.
Ali Hill looks at a photograph of the Titanic.
Second and third class cabins on the Titanic are recreated.
A first class cabin from the Titanic is recreated.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March. Three screens give visitors a virtual tour of inside the Titanic.
A slow rollercoaster shows old and reconstructed videos of how the Titanic was built.
Visual tour of the Titanic Belfast Signature Building which opens to the public on Saturday 31 March.
Michael Quinn (8) looks at the interactive pictures of the Titanic Drawing Rooms in Gallery 3.
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Computer video projections of passengers are displayed in a recreation of a second class cabin at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Visitors look down on a projection showing images of the wreck of the Titanic on the seabed at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Visitors look at a projection showing images of the wreck of the Titanic on the seabed at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Visitors look at a computer video projection of the interior of The Titanic at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Computer video projections of passengers are displayed in a recreation of a third class cabin at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A worker cleans the surface of an exhibit at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Visitors look at a computer video projection of the interior of The Titanic at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Visitors look at a computer video projection of the interior of The Titanic at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Computer video projections of a passenger and a crew member are displayed in a recreation of a first class cabin at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A boy looks up at a window etching depicting the launch of The Titanic at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A recreation of the Harland and Wolff shipyard is dominated by a large computer generated image at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A girl looks up at a painting depicting the launch of The Titanic at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A projection of the Harland and Wolff shipyard sits atop a recreation of the Arrol Gantry at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A boy runs across an interactive projection of the Harland and Wolff drawing Office at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: A visitor walks through a recreation of the Harland and Wolff shipyard at the Titanic Belfast visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Visitors walk through the atrium of the Belfast Titanic visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The panels lining the walls of the atrium are the same size and texture as those fitted to the hull of the ship. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND - MARCH 27: Sun beams into the atrium of the Belfast Titanic visitor attraction on March 27, 2012 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The panels lining the walls of the atrium are the same size and texture as those fitted to the hull of the ship. The Titanic Belfast Experience is a new £90 million visitor attraction opening on March 31, 2012. One hundred years ago the maiden voyage of the ill-fated passenger liner Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic on the night of April 14, 1911 with the loss of 1517 lives. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
This composite image, released by RMS Titanic Inc., and made from sonar and more than 100,000 photos taken in 2010 from by unmanned, underwater robots, shows a small portion of a comprehensive map of the 3-by-5-mile debris field surrounding the stern of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean.
Belfast Telegraph:Page One/Titanic. 16/4/1912
This is an undated photo showing the bow of the Titanic at rest on the bottom of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland. The first tourists to see the bow up close viewed it from the portholes of a tiny submersible in early September. (AP Photo/Ralph White)
Launch of the Titanic, published in the Belfast Telegraph 31/5/1911
This composite image, released by RMS Titanic Inc., and made from sonar and more than 100,000 photos taken in 2010 from by unmanned, underwater robots, shows a small portion of a comprehensive map of the 3-by-5-mile debris field surrounding the stern of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean.
This composite image, released by RMS Titanic Inc., and made from sonar and more than 100,000 photos taken in 2010 from by unmanned, underwater robots, shows a small portion of a comprehensive map of the 3-by-5-mile debris field surrounding the stern of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean.
Titanic was driven by two gigantic wing propellers measuring over 23 feet in diameter and a center propeller spanning more than 16 feet.
A shipyard worker's ticket to the launch of the RMS Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Lord Pirrie, chairman of H&W (left) and Bruce Ismay, chairman of White Star, make a final tour of inspection of Titanic before her launch. 31/5/1911. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic first class suite bedroom 'b58'. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic at fitting-out wharf with three out of four funnels fitted. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic. Hydraulic launch rams below port bow. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic, double bottom and initial plating of tank top of Olympic, with keel of Titanic laid on No.3 slip. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic, port near profile during outfitting at Thompson deepwarter wharf. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic, upper part of stern frame in position. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
A page of the document written by Laura Francatelli, which is her eyewitness account of the sinking of the Titanic
A woman examines a leather boot in an exhibition of artefacts recovered from the wreck of the Titanic on November 3, 2010 in London, England
A photo of the Titanic's giant propellers and rudder. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The detailed drawing of the RMS Titanic used at Lord Mersey's inquiry into the 1912 disaster.
The Titanic's two main engines near completion in engine works erecting shop. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Duff Gordon, Titanic survivor
Titanic. Port bow 3/4 profile afloat immediately after launch. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Launch of the Titanic, published in the Belfast Telegraph 31/5/1911
Titanic first class cafe parisienne. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic. The Great gantry, Queen's Island, Belfast. This photograph shows the enormous scale of the ship, together with the complex structure of the enfolding steel gantry, from which she will soon be free. The photograph also reflects old and new maritime technologies, with the traditional wooden schooner in the foreground contrasting eith the modernity ot Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic. In this photograph of the cabinet shop, taken in 1899, a small army of cabinet-makers are at work. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic workers
Workmen prepare the Titanic slipway. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Millvina Dean the last living survivor of the Titanic disaster was today Thursday April 11, 2002, due to open a rejuvenated exhibition to mark the 90th anniversary of the disaster. Ms Dean, 90, was only nine weeks old when the ship hit an iceberg in the Atlantic on her maiden voyage and sank on April 15 1912, claiming the lives of 1,500 people. The survivor will open Titanic Voices the 90th Anniversary Exhibition at the Maritime Museum in Bugle Street, Southampton. The permanent exhibition has been upgraded with new exhibits, including images from the interior of Titanic's sister ship RMS Olympic
Dorothy Gibson, Titanic survivor
Patrick Dillon, Titanic survivor
Titanic leaving Belfast. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The wedding ring and locket property of Carl Asplund and the wedding ring of Selma Asplund are seen at Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, England Thursday, April 3, 2008. The locket and one of the rings were recovered from the body of Carl Asplund who drowned on the Titanic, they are all part of the Lillian Asplund collection of Titanic related items.
A heavily water stained leather bound journal bearing notes figures relating to the Asplund family, the property of Carl Asplund, is seen at Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, England Thursday, April 3, 2008. The locket and one of the rings were recovered from the body of Carl Asplund who drowned on the Titanic, they are all part of the Lillian Asplund collection of Titanic related items.
A unique emigrant inland forwarding order to the White Star office in New York, is seen at Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, England Thursday, April 3, 2008. The locket and one of the rings were recovered from the body of Carl Asplund who drowned on the Titanic, they are all part of the Lillian Asplund collection of Titanic related items.
Photographs of (from left) Felix Asplund, Selma and Carl Asplund and Lillian Asplund, are seen at Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, England Thursday, April 3, 2008. The locket and one of the rings were recovered from the body of Carl Asplund who drowned on the Titanic, they are all part of the Lillian Asplund collection of Titanic related items.
A gold plated Waltham American pocket watch, the property of Carl Asplund, is seen in front of a modern water colour painting of the Titanic by CJ Ashford at Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, England Thursday, April 3, 2008. The locket and one of the rings were recovered from the body of Carl Asplund who drowned on the Titanic, they are all part of the Lillian Asplund collection of Titanic related items.
An emigration contract/ticket, purchased by the Asplund family for passage from Southampton to New York, and used on the Titanic, is seen at the Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, England Thursday, April 3, 2008. The locket and one of the rings were recovered from the body of Carl Asplund who drowned on the Titanic, they are all part of the Lillian Asplund collection of Titanic related items.
The crew of the RMS Titanic, pictured just before her maiden voyage. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The hull of the S.S. Titanic. under construction in dry dock. The tragic sinking of the Titanic nearly a century ago can be blamed on low grade rivets that the ship's builders used on some parts of the ill-fated liner, two experts on metals conclude in a new book. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
This photo provided by Christie's auction house shows a life preserver from the ill-fated R.M.S. Titanic found during the initial search for survivors and owned by the same family for 90 years. Going on the auction block in June, it is the first Titanic life jacket to be offered at auction in the United States, and is one of about six believed to have survived to this day, Christie's said Thursday, May 29, 2008.
The Dutch Suite aboard the RMS Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Roberta Maioni, a survivor of the Titanic disaster.
Roberta Maioni, a survivor of the Titanic disaster.
The White Star Line badge that was given to Roberta Maioni, a survivor of the Titanic disaster, by a man she was said to have fallen in love with during the boat's maiden voyage.
Sheet music for "Put Your Arms Around Me, Honey" from the Broadway production "Madame Sherry," (1910) is shown as part of the artifacts collection at a warehouse in Atlanta, Friday, Aug 15, 2008. The 5,500-piece collection contains almost everything recovered from the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which has sat 2.5 miles below the surface of the Atlantic ocean since the boat sank on April 15, 1912.
Third-class tea cup china used by passengers and the crew, is shown as part of the artifacts collection at a warehouse in Atlanta, Friday, Aug 15, 2008. The 5,500-piece collection contains almost everything recovered from the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which has sat 2.5 miles below the surface of the Atlantic ocean since the boat sank on April 15, 1912.
Currency, part of the artifacts collection of the Titanic, is shown as part of the artifacts collection at a warehouse in Atlanta, Friday, Aug 15, 2008. The 5,500-piece collection contains almost everything recovered from the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which has sat 2.5 miles below the surface of the Atlantic ocean since the boat sank on April 15, 1912.
The work shirt of W. Allen, a 3rd class passenger on the Titanic, is shown as part of the artifacts collection at a warehouse in Atlanta, Friday, Aug 15, 2008. The 5,500-piece collection contains almost everything recovered from the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which has sat 2.5 miles below the surface of the Atlantic ocean since the boat sank on April 15, 1912.
A seven of clubs card is shown as part of the artifacts collection at a warehouse in Atlanta, Friday, Aug 15, 2008. The 5,500-piece collection contains almost everything recovered from the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which has sat 2.5 miles below the surface of the Atlantic ocean since the boat sank on April 15, 1912.
The pearl penknife, recovered from the body of Edmund Stone, victim of the Titanic disaster
The Service ForD "E" deck key, belonging to First Class Steward, Edmund Stone, victim of the Titanic disaster
A compensation letter sent to Millvina Dean's mother from the Titanic Relief Fund.
A 100-year-old suitcase belonging to Millvina Dean, the last remaining survivor of the Titanic
Harland & Wolff drawing room. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Jack Thayer, Titanic survivor
The Thermos flask used to feed Titanic survivor baby, Barbara Dainton-West
The "unsinkable" four-funnelled ship the SS Titanic. Part of the White Star Line, Titanic sank off Newfoundland on her maiden voyage to the USA after striking an iceberg (14-15/4/1912). Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The Titanic being built in Belfast. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
One of the three Titanic propellers -- the stern section landed upside-down.Photographed by Leonard Evans on 2 September 2000 from submersible MIR 1 -- 2.38 miles below surface of Atlantic Ocean.
Bow of Titanic - Photographed by Leonard Evans on 2 September 2000 from submersible Mir-1 -- 2.35 miles below surface of Atlantic Ocean.
Titanic stoker William McQuillan was feared lost at sea, but his grave was subsequently discovered in Canada after 93 years... the last resting place of an Ulster-born Titanic victim.
An 18-carat gold pocket watch which is among the rare artefacts connected to the Titanic to be sold by Bonhams and Butterfields in Massachusetts in the US on May 1. The watch, which was damaged when disaster struck mid-Atlantic, belonged to Nora Keane, an Irish immigrant, living in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania with her brothers and sisters.
A pair of glasses is displayed in the Titanic: Aritifact Exhibition at the Metreon on June 6, 2006 in San Francisco, California.
Binoculars are displayed in the Titanic: Aritifact Exhibition at the Metreon on June 6, 2006 in San Francisco, California.
One of the images on display at the Titanic - Built in Belfast exhibition in Union Station, Washington DC.
Story of the Titanic sinking on the Belfast Telegraph front page
The transporting of the Titanic's anchor. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The Titanic Report at a book fair in the Wellington Park Hotel. The document, dated July 30, 1912, was the main attraction at the Belfast Antiquarian Book Fair in the Wellington Park Hotel. The report, which was published three months after the tragedy, was presented for sale by Arthur Davidson of Davidson Books at Spa, Ballynahinch
Titanic designer Thomas Andrews. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
A deckchair removed from the Titanic just moments before it set sail from Cork.
Lillian Asplund, the last US survivor from the sinking of the Titanic, has died.
A ticket for the maiden voyage of Titanic.
People look at the 15 ton 13' by 30' portion of the First-Class C-Deck hull, one of the artifacts from the Titanic, at the Metreon on June 6, 2006 in San Francisco, California.
A telegraph wheel from the Titanic is displayed in the Titanic: Artifact Exhibition at the Metreon on June 6, 2006 in San Francisco, California.
Artifacts from the Titanic are displayed in the Titanic: Artifact Exhibition at the Metreon on June 6, 2006 in San Francisco, California.
A bowler hat is displayed in the Titanic: Aritifact Exhibition at the Metreon on June 6, 2006 in San Francisco, California. The exhibition opens on June 10, 2006 and will feature more than 300 authentic artifacts that have been recovered from Titanic's debris field. (Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)
Olympic and Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Shipyard worker William Parr (background) pictured in the Titanic gym along with instructor T W McCawley
Giant starboard anchor of the Titanic is raised for the last time. 1.55pm 11th April 1912 in a picture taken by Father Browne.
1st class dining room on RMS Titanic taken by Father Browne.
Marconi Room on RMS Titanic showing Harold Bride in a picture taken by Father Browne.
White Star Wharf, Queenstown (Cobh) showing crowds waiting to embark on the tenders in a picture taken by Father Browne.
Brilliant new footage of a first class cabin on the Titanic. A live television link-up shows spectacular footage of the captain's cabin
Brilliant new footage of a first class cabin on the Titanic. A live television link-up shows spectacular footage of the captain's cabin
Pipes and the captain's bathtub are shown in this July 2003 photo, of what remains of the captain's cabin on the Titanic more than two miles underwater in the north Atlantic. Recent research dives to the legendary shipwreck are showing the vessel is deteriorating faster than earlier thought.
Front page of Belfast Telegraph
Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The key to the binoculars store on the Titanic
Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Shipyard men fitting the starboard tailshaft of the Titanic prior to her launch. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The Titanic launches into the water. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The shipyard men leaving Queen's Island at the end of a working day in May 1911. Some of them have boarded electric trams for parts of the city beyond walking distance. In the background the Titanic can be seen under her huge gantry. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
A few of the 15,000 workmen employed by Harland and Wolff Ltd. at Queen's Island, Belfast, with Titanic in the background.
Three loftsmen, pictured in 1910 chalking the lines of a ship on portable wooden flooring at Harland and Wolff. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The Titanic had a fully equiped gymnasium 44 feet long and 18 feet wide. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Titanic. Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland. Collection Harland & Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Long-lost film footage of the Titanic, showing the doomed ship moving slowly through Belfast Lough, has been discovered in the loft of a house in Glasgow. The Titanic moored in Belfast before it set sail on its fateful journey
Long-lost film footage of the Titanic, showing the doomed ship moving slowly through Belfast Lough, has been discovered in the loft of a house in Glasgow.
Frances Godden of Bonhams auction house inspects a silver table centrepiece from the a la carte restaurant on the White Star liner Titanic which sunk in 1912.
A very rare lunch menu for the first full meal served aboard the Titanic, dated April 2, 1914.
A letter written by first-class passenger Miss Alice Lennox-Conyngham to her nephew Alan Duff on the Titanic. The letter, postmarked only three days before the liner hit an iceberg and sank on its maiden voyage in 1912, had been used as a bookmark for years by its unsuspecting owner before a chance conversation revealed its value.
Titanic Ship
First class tea cup china used by passengers on the Titanic
Third class china used by passengers and the crew on the Titanic
FILE - John Zaller, creative director of Premier Exhibitions, discusses objects from the Titanic's Verandah Cafe on display in the "Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition" at the Discovery Times Square Exposition in New York, in this June 24, 2009
Lord Pirrie, the former head of Harland & Wolff and instigator of the Olympic Class liners constructed on the Queen's Island almost 100 years ago.
First Class menu from the RMS Titanic.
Lunch menu from the RMS Titanic.
Colin Cobb's Titanic Walking Tours. The pump house at Thompson graving dock.
Colin Cobb's Titanic Walking Tours. An original keel block from the Thompson graving dock
Colin Cobb's Titanic Walking Tours. The Thompson graving dock and pump house
Colin Cobb's Titanic Walking Tours. The Thompson graving dock and pump house where the Titanic's hull inspection and propeller work was done

100 initial impressions of Belfast's newest and biggest tourist attraction.



1 Barbara Quigley, a retired geography teacher from Belfast, living in Edinburgh: “It's quite stunning and very original. I did not realise that the building is the symbol of the White Star Line.”

2 Anita Robinson (30), an administrator from Cavehill in Belfast: “You were imagining you would see the artifacts, but the visuals and everything made it so much more. There's so much to take in.”

3 Anita Harris (54), a GP receptionist from Cavehill in Belfast: “It's incredible, absolutely amazing. It just feels like it brings the Titanic to you.”

4 Kate Glackin, a retired occupational therapist from Four Winds in Belfast: “Very impressed, it's very interesting. All the videos and the information about the ropeworks and the tobacco works — they tell you about how the women (in Belfast) lived, going to

work at 6.30am and back at 6.30pm.”

5 Scott Jamison (30), a musician from Four Winds in Belfast: “We have been looking at the outside (of the building) for the last six months — I love it inside. I just love the interior and the roofing.”

6 Caroline Jamison (69), a retired civil servant from Sydney, Australia: “It’s wonderful. It’s commemorative and it’s a celebration.”

7 Alexander Jamison (70), a retired electrical officer from Belfast who worked at Harland & Wolff in the 1960s: “I think it’s marvelous. I can’t believe the change in this area compared to when I worked here. Coming here is bringing back all these memories.”

8 Juli Cuatriz (41), a nurse from the Phillipines: “It's very good. The surroundings look like a real part of a ship.”

9 Shevaun Cuatriz (8) from Belfast: “It's very detailed and it looks like the Titanic so much.”

10 Fiona McBride (50), a civil servant from Stormont in Belfast: “Tremendous. I did not expect it to be so vivid and in depth.”

11 Lorraine Calvert (43), a civil servant from Stormont in Belfast: “It really is a unique experience, whether you are from Belfast or Brazil.”

12 Ryan Shi (20), a student from south China: “It's very modern and impressive.”

13 Jim Barnes (54), a retired civil servant from Bangor: “It’s magnificent, really magnificent. It’s well worth the visit.”

14 Robert Craig (60), an electrician from Carrickfergus: “Brilliant. I like the view of it from the outside. From all (every part) of Belfast you can see it.”

15 Jean Pierre Carre from France, patisserie chef of Choux Choux in Bangor: “It’s beautiful. I love it.”

16 Moira Craig (56), a manager from Carrickfergus: “We think it's a beautiful building.”

17 Tanya Carmichael (44), from Lisburn, now living in Glasgow: “It’s lovely to come home to something positive like this. Glasgow is wall-to-wall Titanic at the minute — everyone is talking about this building.”

18 Valerie Brady (55), a retired civil servant from Stranmillis in Belfast: “I think it's fabulous. Belfast has a lot to be proud of. I think I'm amazed. I could come back and back.”

19 Cardell McIlroy (42), a civil servant from Lisburn: “This is something for our wee country to be proud of for a change.”

20 Lauren Kennedy (22), a student from Dundonald in east Belfast: “It’s like a modern take on the Titanic.”

21 Tina Kambour (55), a teacher from Oklahoma, USA: “It's fantastic. The building is beautiful.”

22 Zev Trachtenberg (57), a teacher at the University of Oklahoma: “I love it. I think it's fantastic.”

23 Maria Smith (40), a nurse from west Belfast: “It's spectacular. It's great for Belfast.”

24 Emma Reid (34), a housewife from Newtownards: “Beautiful, I'm really impressed. You feel like you were in the Titanic.”

25 Michele Thompson (49), a civil servant from Bangor: “I think the building is fantastic.”

26 Jenny Muir (55), a lecturer from east Belfast: “It was very good, but I was disappointed at not being able to see the staircase.”

27 Nick Rogers (65), an administrator from east Belfast: “There was a lot of useful information and interesting exhibits, and there was a great atmosphere.”

28 Lynsey Woods (22), a student from Sydenham in east Belfast: “I think it’s absolutely incredible. The scale of it’s amazing. I’m proud to have something like it in our country.”

29 Rosie Reid (10) from Newtownards: “The ride was really good. It went really high at parts.”

30 Liang Chen (23), a student from south China: “It’s very fashionable and beautiful. I like this style.”

31 Valerie Brown (72), a retired nursery assistant from Belfast: “I think it’s beautiful. We went to afternoon tea in the dining room upstairs and we saw the staircase. It’s great.”

32 Dorothy Holland (77), a retired merchandising worker from Belfast: “It’s gorgeous.”

33 Nelius de Roiste (47), a teacher from Fermoy, Cork: “It’s fabulous. The height of the building and the height of the Titanic originally... it’s very fitting.”

34 Jean Hamilton (85), retired from Newtownards: “I’m very impressed. But I did not think there were enough guiding people (staff) to guide you around. We found that hard.”

35 Harry Jamieson (71), a retired builder from Portstewart: “Excellent. It’s excellent, the whole thing.”

36 Harriet Hayhurst (22), a marketing executive from east Belfast: “I think it’s great for Belfast to (be able to) compete with other European cities. It’s such an innovative building.”

37 Tori Hayhurst (23), a student from Belmont in Belfast: “It’s absolutely fabulous. I think it will become the biggest thing in Belfast to bring people here. Everyone comes to the Giant’s Causeway. They will come here first now.”

38 Joseph Poxon (20), a student from Chorley near Manchester: “This is my first time in Belfast. We went to the sixth floor and you can see really nice views of the city. You could see the slipways where the Titanic was launched from and you can see the work going on there today — the old and the new.”

39 William Hayhurst (20), a student from east Belfast: “It’s very impressive. I like the way they have incorporated the Titanic theme throughout, from first-class down to third-class. It’s very well set out.”

40 Maryne Quioc (19), a student from Lyon in France: “It’s very interesting. I will be telling my friends at home about it, yes.”

41 Geraldine Gaw, a housewife from Warrenpoint: “It’s wonderful for the people of east Belfast that this is on their doorstep. It took us three hours to go around it (the building). There’s so much to it.”

42 Antoinette Murray (33), a nurse from Dundalk: “It’s very interesting. The bit where we were in the simulator was fantastic. It was so real.”

43 Sabrina Dolan (33), an office manager from Dundalk: “The whole thing is excellent — it’s something special. Driving on the way here we saw the building and it looks great.”

44 David Gaw (59), a GP from Belfast, now living in Warrenpoint: “A sense of pride, that’s the emotion — to be here when this country is just emerging. I think everybody in this part of the world should feel a sense of pride in this (building).”

45 Phares Patterson (80), a retired sheet metal worker from Finaghy in Belfast, who worked at Harland & Wolff: “I’m not a great believer in something that failed being celebrated. It’s the memory of the people who lost their lives I am thinking about today.”

46 Charlene McVicker (36), a customer account manager from Dunmurry in Belfast: “It’s fabulous — absolutely outstanding. The whole visuals they have are really impressive. The kids really got into it.”

47 Erinn McVicker (8) from Belfast: “We loved the ride. It’s really exciting.”

48 Sonia O’Hare (42), a university school manager from Banbridge: “It’s excellent. We will be coming back here for sure.”

49 Anne Levey, a retired teacher from Lisburn Road in Belfast: “I just thought it was class. I loved the way it took you up through the different levels of the ship. The variety and the depth means there’s plenty to engage you.”

50 Joe Levey (69), a retired teacher from Lisburn Road in Belfast: “I was very impressed, I must say. I think that the staff are very nice. They did everything they could for you.”

51 Caitlim Potts (21), a student from Ohio: “There was a lot of information and there is a lot to see. But we were not sure where to go sometimes. The organisation wasn’t great.”

52 Anna Topf (26), a student from Salzburg in Austria: “I thought it would be more interactive. There were very good parts, like the tour through the ship. But the presentation was not perfect.”

53 Mary O’Hart (45), a farmer from Newtownbutler in Co Fermanagh: “It’s great, the shows and everything.”

54 Conor O’Hart (47), a farmer from Newtownbutler in Co Fermanagh: “I think the staircase should be included, especially for people travelling.”

55 Oliver Brennan (70) from Andersonstown in Belfast: “Content very good. I was disappointed the staircase wasn’t open to the public.”

56 Paul Brennan (17) from Andersonstown, Belfast: “H&W ride experience was excellent. I would recommend it to my friends.”

57 Christopher Murphy (10) from Ballyahinch, Co Down: “I’ve been looking forward to this for weeks and now I’m going to tell my friends.”

58 Rachel Murphy (13) from Ballyahinch: “My favourite part was being able to see how the first-class cabins would have looked.”

59 John McGrillen (50) from Ballynahinch: “Fantastic to see the final product after following the project in the media since its inception.”

60 Donna Irwin from Limavady: “Modern class divisions same as Titanic, upper class see staircase, normal people don’t. Other than no staircase it was fantastic, especially interactive features.”

61 Mark Irwin (8) from Limavady: “I knew a lot already from learning in school, but the H&W tour experience was the best.”

62 Lee Hamilton (8) from Limavady: “The 3D floor was amazing.”

63 Sophie Hughes (14) from Templepatrick: “It was great to get a view of the ship from the workers’ eyes. Some exhibits, especially the Mummy figure, weren’t explained very well.”

64 Tom Place from Donaghadee: “Very impressive, brings the Titanic to life again. It was good to see industrial pre-construction.”

65 Thom Donnelly (9) from Bangor: “The video footage of Titanic was great.”

66 Lorraine McCutcheon from east Belfast: “Amazing and awe-inspiring. The Titanic has come home in spirit.”

67 Nuala from east Belfast: “I would really have preferred to have seen the staircase.”

68 Stuart Cairns from Belfast: “The interactive features were great and there was plenty for all the visitors to use.”

69 Alia Cairns (7) from Belfast: “3D floor was really cool.”

70 Tanya Cairns from Belfast: “it was really good, we really enjoyed it. The exhibition was brilliant.”

71 Tara Thompson (23) from Belfast: “A great interactive stimulus.”

72 Charlotte Gregory (23) from Belfast: “3D floor and H&W ride were excellent.”

80 Sandra Tate from Ballynahinch: “A lot of effort’s clearly gone into the recreation. Much better than the TV documentaries.”

74 Rebecca Gregory (23) from Belfast: “Morse Code wall was effective and emotional. It was like being on holiday, this is something completely new for Belfast.”

75 Joanne Hamp (33) from Maghera: “Interesting and informative. The staff were excellent and plenty of space for all the visitors.”

76 Geoff Hamp (32) from Bournemouth: “Excellent.”

77 Danielle Chambers (16) from Belfast: “Really good to see the 3D figures in the cabin reconstructions.”

78 Rebecca Thompson (16) from Belfast: “I watched all the TV shows to prepare and the exhibition added lots to what I already learned.”

79 Paddy Mooney from Ardglass: “It was really excellent especially the H&W shipyard ride.”

80 Alice Adams (23) from Belfast: “3D see-through glass was fantastic.”

81 Colin Tate from Ballynahinch: “Interesting that the focus was more on the building and Belfast’s contribution than the sinking, like most TV shows and exhibits are.”

82Hang Wu from China: “Very interesting, especially the movie showing Titanic under the sea today.”

83 Dan Feng from China: “Would definitely come back”

84 Alan Clark from Belfast: “View through the different levels of the ship was excellent.”

85 Dixie Martin from Indiana, USA: “3D features were excellent, would definitely return.”



86 Margaret Schnabel (12) from Indiana, USA: “Disappointed to miss H&W ride because of queues but 3D floor view was great.”

87Natalie Brittle from Ballyclare: “Great to see pictures of shipyards.”

88 Alistair Wilson from Ballyclare: “Would come again

but maybe leave the baby at home as there aren’t many seats or baby facilities.”

89 Rosemary McClenaghan from Ballygowan: “We came as part of a Christmas present for the kids (aged 6 and 8) and loved it. Up there with the Disney resorts.”

90 Gary Trew from Belfast: “Very emotional as my father was a riveter on the Titanic and Olympic. A magnificent exhibition.”

91 Dawn Nelson from Templepatrick: “Very well put together, especially the video footage of the wreck. You think you know it all, but you learn so much more.”

92 David Walker from Canada: “I haven’t been on the tour but I have been at a tea function to see the staircase. The building looks like the hull of a ship and icebergs, fantastic.”

93 Susan Bennett from Greenisland: “It felt like we were in another city... wow this is Belfast!”

94 Bridget Black (53) from Belfast: “Finally something to have pride in Belfast for. Very realistic and it’s good to look at personal stories of passengers.”

95 Mary Cummings (80) from Belfast: “Not enough seats through exhibition to have a rest. Staff were great.”

96 Jim McIlvene from Newtownabbey: “It’s a new centrepiece for Belfast. Great shipyard tour and look at early linen trade in Belfast.”

97 Pearse Timony from Belfast, originally Fermanagh: “So much to see you’d need to come back four or five times. Good value for money and more alive than your average museum.”

98 Jade (10) and Mia Heaney (8) from Castledawson: “It was really dangerous for the workers.

Some parts were fun, some parts were sad, but it was all really interesting.”

99 David Alan from Crawfordsburn: “Brilliant, well worth a visit and I’ll definitely come back.”

100 Matthew Rice (14) from Belfast: “H&W ride experience was excellent but it could have been faster.”

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