Belfast Telegraph

Tuesday 29 July 2014

Banned: The books you could be jailed for reading

Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H.Lawrence was banned temporarily in the US, UK and Australia for violating obscenity laws. The tale is about an isolated upper class Bohemian, Connie Chatterley, whose unsatisfactory marriage to a paralysed war veteran, Clifford Chatterley, leads her to engage in sex with other men, including vividly written liaisons with Oliver Mellors, a young gamekeeper on her husband's estate. The ban was lifted in the America and Britain in 1959 and 1960 respectively.
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs was not published in its original form in America in 1959 and courts in Boston banned it for obscenity in 1962. The decision was reversed in 1966 and the disjointed series of vignettes about drug addict William Lee has long since been seen as Burroughs' seminal work.
George Orwell's Nineteen-Eighty-Four, a novel about a dystopian society controlled by thought police, was banned by the Soviet Union in 1950, during Stalin's dictatorship, and was nearly prohibited in the USA and UK during the Cuban Missile Crisis. It is the story of civil servant Winston Smith and contains well-used euphemisms for state control as Big Brother, new speak and Room 101.

We look at ten controversial books which have been banned here and around the world.

Many books have been banned for not conforming to the political, religious or moral codes of their day.

>>Click on the image to launch guide

Ok, so you're unlikely to be put in jail these days, but you might have been once so read carefully.

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