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How to be certain your Father's Day gift is on the write lines

Published 06/06/2015

Bear Grylls
Bear Grylls

Whether your dad loves cars, sport, adventures or escape, there's plenty of reading material with his name on it, says Hannah Stephenson.

FOR SPORTS-MAD DADS

Boris Becker's Wimbledon

Boris Becker (Blink, £19.99)

The man himself reveals what the great tennis tournament has meant to him, from winning it at the tender age of 17, charting the ups and downs of his career, what is wrong with the game today and how he sees its future. Illustrated with glorious pictures of the great and the good of the sport.

Speed Kings

Andy Bull (Bantam, £12.99)

The epic, untold story of a ragtag bunch of four adventurers who came together in 1932 to win bobsleigh gold in the 1932 Winter Olympics. The book charts their story of loose living, risk-taking and hell-raising in an age of decadence, and of their race against the odds to become the fastest men on ice.

FOR ADRENALIN JUNKIES

Ghost Flight

Bear Grylls (Orion, £16.99)

The TV action man and adventurer delivers his fast and furious debut novel introducing The Hunter, Will Jaeger, who sets out to defeat a terrifying conspiracy emanating from the darkest days of Nazi Germany. Grylls' experiences in the elite forces, as an expedition leader and survival expert, as well as the recently uncovered details about his grandfather's top-secret military work during the Second World War, underpins this fictional tale.

FOR THRILLER SEEKERS

The Slaughter Man

Tony Parsons (Century, £12.99)

You may know Parsons for his softer, emotional tales of the heart, in such bestsellers as Man And Boy, but his second thriller sees the return of Detective Max Wolfe, who investigates the murder of a wealthy London family and the abduction of their child. The weapon? A gun for stunning cattle.

FOR HISTORY BUFFS

The Codebreakers

James Wylie and

Michael McKinley (Ebury, £20)

The stories of Bletchley Park and the spies of the Second World War are well known, but it was the Room 40 codebreakers and their colleagues across the intelligence services much earlier on that started it all. This fascinating book tells the remarkable story of a small group of codebreakers and their essential work that helped win the First World War.

FOR BEHIND THE SCENES FANS

A Slip Of The Keyboard

Terry Pratchett (Corgi, £7.99)

The late, great writer earned a place in the hearts of readers the world over with his bestselling Discworld series, but in recent years, he became equally well-known as an outspoken campaigner for causes including Alzheimer's research and animal rights. A Slip Of The Keyboard brings together the best of Pratchett's non-fiction writing on his life, work and the weirdness of the world; from Granny Pratchett to Gandalf's love life, banana daiquiris to books that inspired him, and from getting started as a writer to the injustices he fought right to the end of his life.

FOR BUDDING CHEFS

Let There Be Meat

James Douglas & Scott Munro (Orion, June 18, £25)

This is the must-have companion for anyone interested in the art of barbecue: wood-smoked, slow-cooked pork and beef, pulled pork, burgers, ribs, steaks and all the mouth-watering condiments that go with them. Douglas and Munro (above right) provide their unique insight into American barbecue culture, gleaned from seven years of travel and study in the US, with instructions on how to get the most from your meat and matching drinks with dishes.

FOR POLITICAL ANIMALS

The New Spymasters

Stephen Grey (Penguin, £20)

In this era of email intercepts and drone strikes, many believe that the spy is dead. They couldn't be more wrong. The spying game is changing, but the need for walking, talking sources who gather secret information has never been more acute. In this searing modern history of espionage, Grey takes us from the CIA's Cold War legends, to the agents who betrayed the IRA, through to the spooks inside al-Qaeda and Isis. Techniques and technologies have evolved, but the old motivations for betrayal - patriotism, greed, revenge, compromise - endure.

FOR PETROL HEADS

Top Gear: Planet Garage: Stuff To Do In A World Of Your Own

Richard Porter (BBC Books, £9.99)

Jeremy Clarkson may have made a quick departure, but the world of Top Gear happily lives on. Dads who love the BBC show will appreciate this illustrated celebration of the original man-cave - the garage - as a den, workshop, lab, hiding place and sanctuary. Brilliantly compiled by Top Gear's script writer Richard Porter - and filled with loads of references to the hit show - this hilarious book celebrates the garage and all that happens within its walls hidden away from the rest of the family.

FOR INTREPID TRAVELLERS

Channel Shore

Tom Fort (Simon & Schuster, £14.99)

Dads interested in exploring the shorelines of the United Kingdom will welcome this engaging book, in which the author takes readers on a fascinating journey to find out what is so special about the English Channel, the busiest waterway in the world. Fort dips his toe into Sandgate's waters, chews whelks in Brighton, builds a sandcastle in Sandbanks, sunbathes in Sidmouth, catches prawns in Salcombe and hunts a shark off Looe. Stories of smugglers and shipwreck robbers, beachcombers, gold diggers and fossil hunters abound.

The Times Desktop Atlas of the World

(HarperCollins, £17.99)

Whether casually browsing for a new holiday location or planning an epic journey across continents, the new edition of the prestigious range will provide invaluable inspiration, political information and geographic context for the traveller. As well as maps, it features facts, figures, time zones, climate information and web links for further information.

DADDY MIXTURE

Are You Turning Into Your Dad?

Joseph Piercy (Michael O'Mara, £7.99)

Started buying your jeans for comfort rather than style? Prefer to watch the footie in your favourite armchair, rather than at the pub? Perhaps you've recently found yourself enjoying Gardeners' Question Time, or you're thinking about joining the National Trust? This hilarious book, packed full of stories, advice, amusing quotes and more, will help you spot the signs that you are, indeed, turning into your dad.

Belfast Telegraph

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