Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

Cyndi Lauper: Fame stole my style

Published 11/04/2016

Cyndi Lauper
Cyndi Lauper

Cyndi Lauper's unique style of dress was as popular as her music with her fans.

Cyndi Lauper felt as though she lost her individual dress sense when she became famous.

The American singer sprang onto the music scene in the 1980s with hits such as Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and True Colours. It wasn't just her songs that gained attention though as her quirky style has played a big part in her rise to fame, with fans clamouring to recreate her offbeat looks.

"Before I was a pop star I used to have people throw rocks at me ’cause I was wearing vintage clothing that didn’t fit very well, and it was different," she told Britain's Big Issue magazine. "Someone threw a rock and I’d say, 'Oh really? Where did you get your clothes from? A rack alongside 10 others that were exactly the same?'

"But then when I became famous everyone started dressing like me. I didn’t expect that. I guess they just wanted to have fun. But I felt like I couldn’t be who I was any more because it had all gone. It was like a uniform, this thing I’d put on to empower myself. I’d picked out all those pieces."

She added that while playing club gigs during the early days, each musician had their own space and taste in clothing. Cyndi stuck to her kooky ensembles, while other rising stars such as Madonna chose to go down a different fashion route.

Clothes have always played a big part in the 62-year-old's life and some pieces have even inspired her music.

"I wrote a song once, Hat Full of Stars, about this lucky hat I found," she recalled of the track from the same-titled 1993 album. "I don’t know where the hell it is now, you lose things as you go. I was so lonely at that time. I had my dog. And I held the hat up to the sky and I imagined taking the sky and putting it in my hat. And every time I wore that hat I could close my eyes and see the sky."

© Cover Media

Online Editors

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting?

Read More

From Belfast Telegraph