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Ellie Goulding kickboxes to conquer anxiety

The star used therapy earlier on in her career to tackle the mental weakness.

Singer Ellie Goulding relies on the adrenaline rush she experiences from boxing and kickboxing workouts to help keep her crippling anxiety attacks under control.

The Lights hitmaker has made no secret of her longtime battle with nerves, previously admitting they used to be so bad, she refused to leave her house.

"My new life as a pop star certainly wasn't as glamorous as all my friends from home thought," she recalls in an interview with Well + Good. "Secretly, I was really struggling physically and emotionally."

"I think part of what sparked my panic attacks was not feeling confident enough to believe in myself - I was scared I wasn't as good of a singer as everyone thought I was," she continues. "And as the stakes grew, I was afraid of letting everyone, including myself, down."

Ellie underwent therapy to address the issue, but she still has moments of mental weakness, especially before huge TV gigs.

"Last year, I was asked to perform at the Grammys - a massive honour but, as you can imagine, pretty nerve-wracking," she says. "In the moments before I walked on that stage, I gave myself a good talking-to. I was annoyed for being paralysed with nerves every time I was about to perform on television. I told myself that this was exactly where I was supposed to be and if other people believed in me, I had to start believing in myself."

The 30-year-old, who is known for her fitness, now works to conquer her anxiety problems with high-energy gym sessions, which she often shares footage of online.

"I love that extra kick of adrenaline," she explains. "Keeping fit doesn't mean spending hours at a gym; the key is to find a workout you really love. The more I started doing (boxing and kickboxing) classes and also working out with my trainer, Faisal Abdalla, the better I felt about myself."

Ellie adds, "It wasn't about any change in my outward appearance; it was about seeing and feeling myself get better and stronger. It carried over into other areas of my life, and now I truly feel that exercise - however you like to work out - is good for the soul."

And finding new ways to channel her nervous energy has helped the Brit manage her personal issues both on and off the stage.

"It took time, but I've accepted that everyone feels nervous before they perform - it's not just me," she smiles. "And now that I believe in myself more, that confidence comes through, whether I'm working out, singing onstage, or just hanging out by myself at home."

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