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Jennifer Aniston talks make-up ban

Published 15/07/2015

Jennifer Aniston
Jennifer Aniston

Jennifer Aniston used to sneak sprays of her mother's perfume.

The actress still doesn't overly cake on her cosmetics, preferring natural radiance to an overdone face.

However not everyone favours that look, and Jennifer can't believe how much make-up kids are wearing these days.

"My parents were very strict that way. They didn't want me to grow up too fast. I wasn't allowed to wear make-up until I was 15. I see kids now at 12 years old in full make-up, and I want to, like, shake them and go, 'You really don't understand how fast it's about to end. Don't try to grow up!' Now I officially sound like an old person," she laughed to People magazine.

It wasn't just lipsticks and mascaras her mother Nancy was tough on; a young Jennifer also had to have her perfume vetted.

Though she went for a less than mature scent, Jennifer had her ways of wearing a more grown up smell.

"Miss Dior [was the first perfume I owned]. It doesn't smell [the same] anymore, because it was literally for kids. That was the only reason my mom would let me wear it, even though I would always sneak her perfumes," she recalled.

Now alongside her acting work, the 46-year-old also makes her own fragrances.

"When my girlfriends began to get married, I'd bring bottles of oils to bachelorette parties. Everyone would pass around this beautiful glass antique perfume jar, and then we'd all put in drops of oil and set an intention for the bride," she explained of how she got into fragrance making.

Her latest perfume Near Dusk is out now.

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