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Olivia Wilde can't fit into '70s jeans

Published 08/04/2016

Olivia Wilde
Olivia Wilde

The actress has to have vintage pants tailored to fit her figure.

Actress Olivia Wilde struggles to squeeze her butt into vintage jeans for her hit show Vinyl.

The TRON: Legacy star portrays Devon Finestra, a fashionable model-turned-housewife, in the music-based drama, which is set in the 1970s, and while she appears to easily pull off the boho glam look onscreen, Olivia admits it's not always easy to find pants from that era to fit her figure.

"I'll walk around with the wardrobe assistant saying, 'I want that one, I want that one,'" she told People.com. "I really have been so inspired by all the wardrobe across the board.

"(But) I can't fit into any of the pants because people in the '70s apparently just didn't have hips," she laughed. "I guess that's all the hormones in our food, but I don't understand it. You pick up the jeans and they're straight - there's no butt and there's no hips. They're for a straight body."

However, Olivia, 32, has since learned how to pick out designs which will work for her shape after paying close attention to the styles her onset wardrobe experts lean towards - because those can be more easily tailored.

"Almost everything we wear on the show is real vintage. And that's a lot of effort on the part of our designer and on the part of the team," she explained. "We have a whole kind of workshop to take real vintage items and fix them - because when you buy vintage you sometimes have to do a little bit of tailoring and cleaning.

"We should just be buying things that already exist as opposed to trying to mass produce everything new. Plus, it's fun to buy things that have a story so that you can say this is a vintage Halston, a piece that has been around."

And Olivia, who is co-founder of creative agency Conscious Commerce, which aims to encourage sustainability among consumers, now has the perfect eye for digging through racks of vintage clothing, a hobby she has had since she was 12.

"Now I know what to look for and know what to do when I see something that's messed up," she smiled. "You can buy it, take it to a seamstress and it's not that expensive fix it, clean it. It's much cooler to have something that has history than to just buy something new."

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