Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

Home Life Features

Keith Richard: The greatest survivor of rock 'n' roll

Published 17/10/2015

Keith Richards with ex-wife Anita Pallenberg
Keith Richards with ex-wife Anita Pallenberg
The Rolling Stones in the 1960s
Hellraiser Keith Richards
Keith Richards with the other Rolling Stones
Keith married Patti Hansen

He's the hellraiser who has survived decades of drugs, debauchery and chaos ... all with his health and his marriage and family intact. As he releases a new studio album, Julia Molony looks at the remarkable life of Keith Richards.

A few years ago, Keith Richards and his wife and extended family gathered for a get-together and sun-kissed photo shoot at their tropical retreat on Parrot Cay in the Caribbean. They are a glamorous bunch, a motley crew of grown-up children, golden-headed grandchildren, step-brothers and sisters, the handsome, living and breathing evidence of Richards' colourful life. The pictures were a world away from the dark, self-destructive image with which Keith Richards name is associated.

Now off the drugs, though still fond of a fag and tipple, his life these days is more Sunday supplement than tabloid scandal.

From his formerly chaotic and often dysfunctional approach to relationships and child-rearing, Keith has created a sprawling, messy, but apparently happy family.

Throughout the 70s and the 80s Richards spent over 10 years on a list of celebrities most expected to die young. He'd already had a few narrow escapes by then - perhaps most memorably in 1965, when he was electrocuted on stage by his guitar and knocked out for a full seven minutes before he finally came to, sat up, scratched his chin and asked, "what do I do for an encore?" But it wasn't the wiring that was the greatest risk to his health. For decades, he was wholeheartedly and cheerfully committed to drugs and bad behaviour. He once memorably described a cocktail of heroin and cocaine as "the breakfast of champions." And yet he's survived it all. In 2015, he's still going strong, celebrating more than three decades of marriage this year to former model Patti Hansen, and a new solo album just released to widespread critical acclaim.

He was always a bit of a rebel. The son of an electrician he grew up in Dartford, Kent in a flat above a grocer's shop. But his was a bohemian and arty family populated by actors and musicians. They were unconventional too - his mother split with his father so she could marry her toy boy. Keith ended up expelled from technical college as a teenager. In his memoir, Life published in 2010, he wrote that he grew up in a neighbourhood where "everyone is a thief".

There is an element of performance involved in being Keith Richards. In an interview in 2010 he complained to The Telegraph's Neil McCormick of the burden of upholding the image, saying he sometimes gets "real sick of the skulls and sh*t ... The image thing is a ball and chain. There's nobody like Keith Richards that would ever be alive. No way. But you can't buck the image. As long as I don't have to be that guy all the time, or with my friends. I guess the Keith Richards hard man is something that gives me the room to be who I really am. He's my perimeter defences."

Beyond that perimeter, the rest of the man is reserved for his family. Despite his prodigious reputation for womanising, Richards has always been the committing type. His tumultuous, and infamous, relationship with Anita Pallenberg lasted 13 years, in that time surviving plenty of mutual infidelity, their shared and entrenched drug addictions, and even the tragic loss of their second son Tara, who died of cot death when he was just a baby, when Richards went on tour.

Anita Pallenberg was Brian Jones's girlfriend when Keith first met her. With Jones, she had a famously abusive relationship - the spats between them descended, regularly and spectacularly into physical violence. Keith found her instantly compelling, even though she wasn't available.

But it was on a road trip from Paris to Marrakesh that things started to develop. A party of five, including Jones, Richards and Pallenberg decided to drive across Europe in Richards' blue Bentley nicknamed Blue Lena. "Having this car was already heading for trouble, breaking the rules of the establishment, driving a car I was definitely not born into. Blue Lena had carried us on many an acid-fuelled journey. Modifications included a secret compartment in the frame for the concealing of illegal substances," he wrote in Life. By the time they reached Spain, they'd abandoned Jones in a hospital in Toulouse, and had lost the other two companions enroute. Leaving only Keith and Anita in the car. In Life, Richards reveals an unexpectedly retiring side. "I have never put the make on a girl in my life," he writes. "I just don't know how to do it. My instincts are always to leave it to the woman. I'm tongue-tied. I suppose every woman I've been with, they've had to put the make on me. Meanwhile I'm putting the make on in another way - by creating an aura of insufferable tension. Somebody has to do something. You either get the message or you don't, but I could never make the first move."

It was no exception with Anita, so it was left up to her to break the "insufferable tension" which she did, with characteristic style, by reaching across to make the first move on him as they sat in the back of Blue Lena. "And suddenly we're together... Without even saying things, you have the great sense of relief that something has been resolved," he writes.

They fell almost instantly and madly in love. But Brian Jones was a problem and the new romance threatened to potentially derail the band. "We realised we were creating an unmanageable situation," Richards writes.

Things finally came to a head when having arrived in Marrakesh, Brian Jones picked up two local prostitutes and brought them back to the hotel, trying to push Anita "into a scene". It was the final straw and seemed to crystallise things for Pallenberg, she headed straight for Richards' hotel room. In the middle of the night, Keith and Anita bundled into Blue Lena and disappeared to Tangiers. "It's said that I stole her," he writes. "But my take on it is that I rescued her."

Before long, more dramas arose which threatened to drive them apart, not least when she was seduced by Keith's best friend, Mick Jagger. Keith's sense of betrayal springs from the pages of his autobiography many decades after the event. And it remains, to this day, a source of contention between the two Stones. Still, Richards made sure he got his revenge by having spending a night with Marianne Faithful, Jagger's then girlfriend.

Richards and Pallenberg have two surviving children, Marlon and Dandelion, both of whom grew up in the thick of their parents' chaotic, drug-addled lives and seem to have become remarkably well-adjusted adults despite it all. According to Pallenberg, after Marlon was born (she'd discovered she was pregnant just after Brian Jones was found dead in a swimming pool) he was simply recruited into the travelling circus with the Stones. His father, devoted to him from the first, took him on tours with the band starting when he was seven years old, as his "road buddy", making him responsible for getting him up in the morning after binges. Marlon was exposed almost constantly to drugs, but it seems to have made him averse. He later said he found them "repulsive, but I did learn to clean them up and not to touch them and not to leave them lying around.'"

Eventually, in 1980, Richards ended his relationship with Anita, who by then was, by his description, "off-the-rails, lethal and crazy". Dandelion was sent to live with Keith's mother Doris in Dartford, while Marlon shuttled between his two parents - life on the road with his dad, and the unheated, semi-derelict home where his mother lived. He was in the house when Anita's teenage lover Scott Cantrell shot himself, allegedly during a game of Russian roulette. Against all odds, Marlon who is now in his 40s is a content adult, happily married with children of his own. Anita, an impressive survivor herself, eventually also got clean. Now 71, she's explored careers in acting and fashion, and lives in Chelsea, London.

By the time of the split, Keith already met the woman who would become his wife, Patti Hansen, at Studio 54 when he was 35 and she was 23. They danced together that night, but didn't get together until his 36th birthday party later that year. Hansen has said that a friend tried to steer her away from Keith, but she was drawn to his wild side. "At three o'clock in the morning he wants to go check out some clubs and hang out. I was just ready. I think he saw that I was a trouper. That I could hang with him."

Though, over the course of their life together she would eventually manage to rein in his anarchic spirit to some degree, and for almost 35 years has been the backbone of a stable family life for their three children.

Patti says that she and Keith saved each other. "We have had our trials; that's for sure," she says. "But on the whole, it's great. We both have the same morals and background. We both come from working-class families. I think we are very similar in many ways. You know, he works and I have the house waiting for him with all the flowers and make sure he has all his bangers and mash in the fridge."

Crosseyed Heart, the new album from Keith Richards, is out now

Belfast Telegraph

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting?

Read More

From Belfast Telegraph