Belfast Telegraph

Friday 25 July 2014

That's a scoop Guinness is good for you

The ad men were right all along: Guinness is actually good for you, according to a new study on the medicinal benefits of the black stuff.

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin have found that a pint of stout at meal times may work just as well in preventing heart attacks as taking low-dose aspirin every day.



A study comparing the blood-thinning effects of beer found that Guinness is far superior in reducing blood clots than lager.



Dogs, which have narrowed arteries that mimic those in humans with heart disease, were given just over a pint each of lager and Guinness to test the health-giving properties of beer.



The Guinness-drinking dogs were found to receive the most health benefit.



The study concluded that certain compounds in stout, similar to antioxidants found in some fruits and vegetables, can slow down cholesterol from clogging up artery walls.



But Brewing Research International, which conducts research for the brewing industry, was not entirely convinced.



"We already know that most of the clotting effects are due to the alcohol itself, rather than any other ingredients," said a spokesman for Brewing Research International.



But if the research proves, true it would back up claims made by the famous ad campaign by SH Benson in the 1920s, which led to the tongue-in-cheek discovery of a so-called "Vitamin G" found uniquely in Guinness that suggested a recommended daily allowance of three pints a day.



The famous slogan was borne after Guinness drinkers were asked how they felt after a pint. Most people responded that they "felt good" and the catchphrase was born.



Doctors in Ireland and the UK use to give it to post-operative patients and expectant and nursing mothers used to drink it before the link was made between alcohol consumption during pregnancy and foetal alcohol syndrome.

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