Belfast Telegraph

Get the look: Mad to miss the new wave of retro style

Our ongoing passion for all things 1950’s has prompted a demand for retro furnishings in this year’s Autumn/Winter interiors collections.

So, if you’ve been glued to Mad Men — or more recently The Hour — on TV, you’ll be glad to hear it’s easy to get your fix of post-war style.

The 50’s was a decade of affluence compared to the spartan war years. This was reflected in homes with everything from chrome-trimmed refrigerators appearing in the kitchen to clothes hooks to hang hats, overcoats, ties and scarves — all the must-have fashions that became de rigeur after years of rationing.

Wall-to-wall carpets, stylish lamps and brightly coloured wall and floor coverings all became part of the home-style mix. Home-owners were more than happy to shrug off the dreary shades and|restrictions imposed on them|during World War II.

New design flourished as modern inventions such as the fridge freezer and dishwasher started to appear in homes. Colour was back with red being one of the most popular hues — whether it was on an upholstered armchair or glass bathroom tiles, people happily embraced this new age with bold interior choices.

The good news is you don’t have to go rummaging around vintage shops to find those all-important pieces for an authentic 50’s look. The high street has responded to demand with its version of this stylish decade.

Get a striped fabric armchair, £169.99 from Homesense.com — an item of furniture which would have been considered luxurious back in the day.

Meanwhile, there are some really fun accessories that add a nostalgic touch, such as a 50’s housewife print cushion, £65 from Bouf.com. Or what about an Atomic coat rack, £18.95 also Bouf.com, which echoes the A-bomb paranoia of the period.

B&Q has a really cool Tecton chrome-effect floor lamp, £99.98 Diy.com/in-store, while Lily and Lime has found some great London transport-inspired artwork like this Piccadilly sign for lovers of all things vintage.

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