Belfast Telegraph

Monday 24 November 2014

Wider double-jobbing ban proposed

Finance minister Sammy Wilson is among three high-profile politicians who still perform two roles
Sammy Wilson - MP and MLA
Queen Elizabeth delivers her speech at the State Opening of Parliament, in central London alongside the Duke of Edinburgh.
Members of The Guards march on The Mall ahead of the State Opening of Parliament
Queen Elizabeth II travels by coach to the State Opening of Parliament
Prince Charles, Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall travel to the State Opening of Parliament
Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall travels to the State Opening of Parliament
Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh leave Buckingham Palace ahead of the State Opening of Parliament in London.
Queen Elizabeth II and The Duke of Edinburgh laugh as they arrive for the State Opening of Parliament, at the Houses of Parliament in London.
Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh
Queen Elizabeth attends the State Opening of Parliament
Queen Elizabeth II arrives
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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II delivers her speech during the State Opening of Parliament on May 8, 2013 in London.

A proposed ban on Stormont Assembly members double-jobbing as Westminster MPs is set to be extended to include the Irish Parliament.

The Government's Northern Ireland Bill, which was outlined in the Queen's Speech, contains a measure to end the practice of politicians double-jobbing in Northern Ireland.

The prevalence of MLAs who also sat in the House of Commons as MPs developed into an issue of public concern in the region, prompting the main parties at Stormont to pro-actively reduce their number of representatives filling two jobs.

But three high-profile politicians - Democratic Unionist finance minister Sammy Wilson, former DUP sports minister Gregory Campbell and SDLP leader Alistair McDonnell - still perform both roles.

Secretary of State Theresa Villiers outlined her intention to outlaw the practice by 2015 when she published the draft form of the Northern Ireland Bill earlier this year. But during the consultation exercise on the proposals, some contributors pointed out a potential loophole that while it was envisaged that MLAs could no longer be MPs, there was hypothetically nothing to prevent them becoming elected TDs in the Republic of Ireland.

The Bill, which will brought before the House of Commons later this week, contains a ban on MLA double-jobbing that covers both the House of Commons and the Irish Dail in Dublin.

As expected, the legislation will also introduce a greater degree of transparency around donations to political parties in Northern Ireland.

Confidentiality has long been afforded to such donors over potential concerns for their safety. Under the proposed legislation, it is envisaged that the region's Electoral Commission will be able to publish further information about donations, though stopping short of revealing names and addresses.

A measure to extend the length of Assembly terms to five years is included as well, as are changes as to how the region's justice minister is appointed. The portfolio, due to its sensitive nature, is currently not allocated under the d'Hondt mechanism used to appoint other ministers, and instead on the basis of a cross-community vote in the Assembly.

The system allows for the minister to be removed from office by way of a similar cross-community vote. The Bill proposes to provide more job security for the minister by ending this removal option.

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