Belfast Telegraph

Thursday 25 December 2014

Smith icon Morrisey - Queen is anti-democracy

Morrissey
Morrissey
A sticker on a lamppost critical of the state visit to Ireland by the Queen.
Princess Elizabeth of York in 1927
George V with Queen Mary visiting Ireland in 1911, the last reigning monarchs to visit.Queen Victoria visiting Dublin in 1900
A poster is seen on a lamp post in advance of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit on May 16, 2011 in Dublin, Ireland.
PRESIDENT MARY ROBINSON AND QUEEN ELIZABETH
George V with Queen Mary visiting Ireland in 1911, the last reigning monarchs to visit.Queen Victoria visiting Dublin in 1900
The Royal Standard flag flies from an Irish pub ahead of the state visit to Ireland by the Queen on May 16, 2011 in Dublin, Ireland.
Members of the public walk past phone boxes taped shut by police ahead of the state visit to Ireland by the Queen
Picture dated 1935 showing Princess Elizabeth sitting in the studio of Hungarian sculptor Sigismund de Strobl (background).
NI visit 1949. The young Princess Elizabeth visits Northern Ireland.
Gardai and security outside the Garden of Remembrance in Dublin city centre, ahead of the royal Visit by Britain's Queen of Elizabeth II and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh this week.
People walk past graffiti in Dublin city centre, ahead of the royal visit by Queen Elizabeth II
Queen Elizabeth II meets Dame Helen Mirren at a reception to celebrate young people in the performing arts, at Buckingham Palace
The 8th Royal Hussars lead the procession for King George V and Queen Mary down Grafton Street,Dublin during the Royal Visit in 1911
WINSTON CHURCHILL MEETS QUEEN ELIZABETH II
KING GEORGE V1865-1936
King George V, arriving at Belfast City Hall accompanied by Queen Mary to the opening of the first Ulster Parliament. 22/6/1921.
King George V1 (VI) : Coronation on May 12th 1937. The Royal family robed and crowned on the balacony of Buckingham Palace after the coronation, with the princesses.
Princess Elizabeth with her grandparents King George V and Queen Mary; and Snip the King's Cairn terrier, 1928.
Princess Elizabeth of York in 1927
20/11/1947 Princess Elizabeth, now Queen, and Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten, now the Duke of Edinburgh with their eight bridesmaids in the Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, on their wedding day.
King George V, at Belfast City Hall accompanied by Queen Mary to the opening of the first Ulster Parliament. 22/6/1921.
Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret riding a rocking horse at St. Paul's Waldenbury in August 1932
Princess Elizabeth of York with lilies in 1929
Princess Elizabeth (who became Queen Elizabeth II). The Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Princess Elizabeth (who became Queen Elizabeth II) playing with Victorian glasses. The Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
The Duchess of York with Princess Elizabeth (who became Queen Elizabeth II). The Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Queen Elizabeth:Coronation 1953/Visit to Northern Ireland. In Ballymena.
Queen Elizabeth:Coronation 1953/Ulster Celebrations. Coronation Book Display. 4/6/1953
Queen Elizabeth:Coronation 1953/Ulster Celebrations. Beechill, Lisburn. 30/5/1953
Queen Elizabeth:Coronation 1953/Ulster Celebrations. Loopland Drive Party.
2/6/1953, of the coronation in Westminster Abbey of Britainís Queen Elizabeth II. 50 years on the anniversary will be marked later Monday June 2, 2003, with a service in the Abbey, attended by members of the Royal family, invited guests and 1,000 members of the public.
2/6/1953. Bishops pay homage to Queen Elizabeth II, at her coronation.

Ex Smiths singer Morrissey has become the latest critic of the Queen's visit to Ireland

The former Smiths frontman -- whose parents emigrated from Dublin to Manchester a year before he was born in 1959 -- launched a scathing criticism of the royal visit, claiming the monarchy is "entirely against any notion of democracy".



In a letter to Dublin-based music magazine 'Hot Press', he called the visit "part of a new palace PR campaign to re-invent the Windsors".



He wrote: "The message from the queen will be the same as ever: who we are born to is more important than what we achieve in life.



"The full meaning of the monarchy is, like the queen herself, a complete mystery to most people.



"The queen also has the power to give back the six counties to the Irish people, allowing Ireland to be a nation once again," wrote the singer, who claimed that not doing so was "fascist".



He continued that people carrying "anti-royal placards" in the vicinity of the royal wedding were informed that they would be removed under the Public Order Act.



"The very existence of the queen and her now enormous family -- all supported by the British taxpayer whether the British taxpayer likes it or not -- is entirely against any notion of democracy, and is against freedom of speech."



Meanwhile, descendants of the leaders of the 1916 Rising have branded the queen's visit bizarre and inappropriate.



James Connolly-Heron, great-grandson of Labour Party founder James Connolly, said the historic visit is full of contradictions.



Honor O Brolchain, the grand-niece of Joseph Plunkett, said she was initially indifferent to the royal visit but now finds the idea ill-judged.



Mr Connolly-Heron said: "The places that she is visiting, the Garden of Remembrance and Croke Park -- it's very inappropriate and insensitive.



"The Garden of Remembrance honours all those who fought and died for Irish freedom and that's where the queen will be laying a wreath. But that dream has not been realised.



"There's a contradiction there. Given that the Queen of England still occupies part of this island, is it not strange that she is honouring those who fought and died? I don't think we are at the stage for that sort of recognition."



Despite her opposition, Ms O Brolchain said she would not protest and that she respects the Government's decision to extend an invite.



Source irish Independent



COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Latest News

Latest Sport

Latest Showbiz