Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 23 November 2014

Titanic victim sent last message in bottle

The Titanic sank off Newfoundland on her maiden voyage to the United States after striking an iceberg
The Titanic sank off Newfoundland on her maiden voyage to the United States after striking an iceberg
This detailed drawing of the RMS Titanic used at Lord Mersey's inquiry is going on public display for the first time in almost a century
A detailed drawing of RMS Titanic used at Lord Mersey's inquiry into the 1912 disaster is going on public display for the first time in almost a century
A newspaper, Illustrated London News, depicts the sinking of the Titanic. Original Publication from a special supplement of 'Graphic'. 14 April 1912.
A list of first-class passengers on board the Titanic is displayed during a press preview 22 June 2007 for the Christie?s New York Ocean Liner sale that will took place 28 June. Eighteen of the items for sale were related to the Titanic.
A hand mirror from the Titanic on display at 'Titanic - The Artifact Exhibit' at the California Science Centre on 6 February 2003 in Los Angeles, California.
Some of the survivors of the Titanic disaster. 1912.
The massive anchor of the White Star liner Titanic is transported to its destination in Belfast by horsedrawn cart.

Jeremiah Burke didn't have time to write a lengthy farewell.

In the early hours of April 15, 1912, as the Titanic sank into the North Atlantic, a 19-year-old from Glanmire, in Cork, put his short note into a holy water bottle given to him a few days earlier by his mother at the quayside in Cobh and threw it overboard.

"From Titanic, goodbye all, Burke of Glanmire, Cork," it simply said.

The teenager drowned along with 1,517 others.

But the bottle -- which his mother had given to him as he set off for the US -- somehow made its way back to shore, landing only a few miles from his family home in Cork one year later.

The letter it contained has been kept in the Burke family for almost a century.

But now one of Jeremiah's nieces, Mary Woods, has decided to donate it to the Cobh Heritage Centre.

"It was found with one of Jeremiah's bootlaces still tied to the bottle," Ms Woods, a councillor from Midleton, said.

"Jeremiah's mother was at a removal several days later when a person came up to her and said 'I'm sorry for your loss'. It was only then that she found out what had happened.

"She died of a broken heart within the year."

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