Belfast Telegraph

Wednesday 30 July 2014

Sacked BBC reporter Jerome Quinn in request for privacy over his finances

A sacked BBC sports presenter alleging unfair dismissal and discrimination at an industrial tribunal said he would apply for evidence about his finances to be heard in private.

Jerome Quinn from Co Tyrone was dismissed by the corporation last year after he posted comments online criticising its coverage of Gaelic games.

In the fourth day of an industrial tribunal, the self-styled face of Gaelic games was told he was required to provide documentary evidence of his efforts to find employment since the dismissal in March 2009.

The evidence will go towards finding out how much his claim is worth if the BBC is found liable.

Mr Quinn said he had worked for up to 50 media organisations “in Belfast, Dublin, Tyrone — you name it” after setting himself up as a freelance web video journalist after he left the BBC.

He said he had considerable costs in setting up business, buying two computers with a Mastercard and paying cash for a camera.

Mr Quinn, who is representing himself, asked to have the weekend to collect documentary evidence. But Tariq Sadiq, the BBC’s lawyer, objected to what he said was a further extension.

He said: “I am on my own now and I’m trying my best about how to get things done. I’m a little bit surprised about how Mr Sadiq has objected. I don’t want come up with half a job.”

Mr Quinn, who claims he was discriminated against because he is Irish and Catholic, asked the panel if evidence about his finances could be heard in private.

Panel chairman Orla Murray said: “It is not normal to have the details heard in private.” He said he would apply for a private hearing.

She said the tribunal sought to deal with the case justly but also “expeditiously and efficiently”.

“It is incumbent on everyone involved in the case to bear that in mind whether they are represented or not,” she said.

The tribunal continues.

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