Belfast Telegraph

Saturday 27 December 2014

After the snow, here comes the ice age

A red deer stag crosses the road as it  comes down from the hills to the River Clunie near Braemar to forage for food as snow continues to cover much of the UK.
A red deer stag crosses the road as it comes down from the hills to the River Clunie near Braemar to forage for food as snow continues to cover much of the UK.
Queen's University of Belfast students enjoying the snow in Botanic Gardens in Belfast yesterday
The scene in North Belfast's Waterworks as a blanket of snow covers the city.
A plane throws up clouds of snow as it prepares for take off at Gatwick Airport in West Sussex following the airport re-opening after it was closed due to the bad weather.
A motorist in County Antrim battles the wintry conditions
Queen's University of Belfast students enjoying the snow in Botanic Gardens in Belfast yesterday
The winter sun shines down on the snow that has settled down by the remains of Brighton's West Pier, as snow continues to cover much of the UK.
Red deer stag near the River Clunie near Braemar forage for food as snow continues to cover much of the UK.
A woman leaves a snow covered phone box in Braemar, as snow continues to cover much of the UK.
A snow boarder gets stuck in the snow as skiers enjoy good conditions at Glenshee Ski centre as snow continues to cover much of the UK.
Sara Kyofuna and Jose Estaban who spent six hours building an igloo near the Grand Canal in Dublin after another night of heavy snow in the capital.
A woman pushing her child in a pram battles through a snow storm in Ballymena, County Antrim yesterday
3rd December 2010. Belfast.Heavy snow is causing problems across Northern Ireland with nearly 40 schools closed and some roads impassable.The scene in North Belfast's Waterworks as a blanket of snow covers the City.
Looking towards Slieve Binnian, Mourne Mtns - by Jon, Portadown
Fiend or foe.... By Robin McCormick. Dec 2010
Silent Valley from Slieve Lamagan, Mourne Mtns - by Jon, Portadown
Craigavon Lake. By J O'Neill. Dec 2010
My Son Zack enjoying the snow. Dec 2010. By Trish Taylor in Derry
Spelga Dam 1.12.10 Taken by Ronan Sherry
Craigavon Lakes 1/12/10. Brian Portadown
My chocolate labrador Levi . Jason Davidson Ballymoney
Mournes snowboarding. Submitted by Gav
Sammy & Harvey enjoying the snow by Miriam Taylor, Belfast
Swans on the canal, Ballynahinch. By Pauline Rainey. Dec 2010
Broadwater Canal Aghalee. By Michelle Myles, Maghaberry
Foraging for food , Ballyclare. By Joan Wilson
Snow covered Brooke Park, Derry
Baby, it's cold outside!. By Sinead Hoben, Newry
Summit of Donard. By Brian, Portadown Caption:
Snowman. By Rod Mulholland Nov 2010
Little Aoibheann McElhone from Claudy braves the cold to make a snowwoman
Adam Kerr (6) makes the most of the snow on monday as he adds the finishing touches to an igloo at the Playtrail in Londonderry.
Stramore Road. Gilford. By 'jocorleone' Nov 2010
First time on a sleigh. Submitted by Jenny Kordys, Drumaness Nov 2010
Two-year-old Sophie Duffy enjoys herself after falling out of her sleigh at LIsnagelvin in Derry
Dromore Lane. By Rod Mulholland.Tobermore. Nov 2010
St Canice's Church Eglinton . By Willie Robb Eglinton Nov 2010
Frozen Cat: By Pauline Belfast
Craigavon lakes frozen and dusted with snow. By Jeremy Clifford, Craigavon Nov 2010
Kells, Antrim.Submitted by 'keveddy'
My pug enjoys snow for the first time. By 'littlestirishone' Nov 2010
Snow covered Brooke Park, Derry. Pablo O'Connor and his mum Laura.
Laura Henderson, south Belfast
River moyola tobermore. picture submitted by Rod Mulholand.Tobermore. 30.03.2010
A woman walks across the M3 in heavy snow in Cavan
A delivery man works in heavy snow in Cavan town
A woman walks through heavy snow in Cavan
Belfast Telegraph readers' pics of winter weather: Icy Waterfall on January 11. By Katie S., Killarney National Park
Snowy Fence around Ballymena. By Barry Lau - Ballymena
RIVER BANN,BALLYDOWN,BANBRIDGE, BY STEPHEN McDOWELL
Gallery of Belfast Telegraph readers' snow pictures Castle Gardens, Lisburn. By Tom Porter
A Winter Sun In Lisburn. By Tom Porter
Beautiful trees on divis mountains. By Pauline
Entrance to Belvoir. By Des Meredith at Belvoir
belvoir forest park. By fiona donnan  belfast
Lisburn's Winter Wonderland. By Tom, Lisburn
Mourne Mountains. By John Mitchell, Belfast
Wallace Park, Lisburn. By Tom, Lisburn
Strule Bridge. By Stevie, Omagh
Angela Eadie & her daughters having fun in the snow.
Cycling like madman on Sunday. By Lawrence Smith , Cavehill
Pictures taken in Aghagallon Village. By Etta Mullan
River Blackwater Maghery
near ballymoney. By nev walker
Foyle Walkway Derry. By Patsy Devine. Derry City
Eglinton village on a winter's morning. By tony doherty
Glenelly Valley Co Tyrone. By Patsy Devine Stroanbrack Co Tyrone
my back garden. By Brendan Donaghy
Cregagh Glen Belfast. By Peter Forster, Belfast
Lack , Co Fermanagh. By Doreen Gibson
Lough Neagh, Alan, Daniel and Aaron Monaghan, Maghery
THE TREE. By Moyaleen By William Pullins
Moira Demesne. By Peter B Waddell
Snow in Lurgan Park. By Margaret Taylor
Maghery, River Blackwater
ross , and alfie the snowman. By ross clarke
The Frozen River Bann in Portadown. By Gary English, Portadown
Rear of Armagh Cathedral in the early evening. By Gary English, Portadown
granny's house in the snow, magheranappin co donegal
My back garden. By Brenda Lennon, Munster, Germany
Frozen lakeside at Lurgan Park. By Jenny Hanna, Lurgan
Brownlow House, from Lurgan Park. By Jenny Hanna, Lurgan
Henry in snow!!By Jenny Hanna, Lurgan
Hazy Shade of Winter, Lagan Meadows. By Gavin Sloan
Shaws Bridge. By Tara, west Belfast.
River Foyle from Bay Park. By Pat Devine Derry City
Scots Pine, Ballinderry. By Peter B Waddell
Topiary, Nutts Corner. By Peter B Waddell
Cavehill. By Philip McCloy
Cavehill Robin. By Philip McCloy
Towards Silent Valley. By N Walker, Belfast
This is what I call a snow man, taken just before Moira roundabout. By Gillian Musgrave
Lady Dixon Park, Belfast. By Audrey Matchett
Frozen Beauty, Lady Dixon Park Malone. By Peter Breene
Lone walker at Lady Dixon Park Malone. By Peter Breene
River lagan at Drumbeg. By Peter Breene
Whitewater River, Kilkeel
Frozen Lough, Temple Co Down. By Iain Gregory
River Foyle, Derry. Photo by John Gallagher
Keeping the road clear at Spelga Dam. By Robert in Kilkeel
Spelga Dam in a snow shower. By Robert in Kilkeel
Slippy. By Chris O'Neill, Lagan belfast
no sailing. By Chris O'Neill Belfast
Noleen Cartmill & daughter Katie enjoy the slopes at Spelga Dam
The McCauley family from Rathfriland share the snowy slopes at Spelga Pass
A Frozen Lagan, Ormeau Bridge, Belfast
Scrabo Hill. By Jim Devlin Dundonald
A Robin on Slieve Donard. By Damien Conway, Belfast
MOSSLEY MILL POND. By ROY ORR MOSSLEY
The Water Hole/ The dam at the back of the Valley Leisure centre Newtownabbey. By Philip Mccloy
mournes..towards silent valley. By n.walker/belfast
Hazy Shade of Winter. By Gavin Sloan Lagan Meadows
Minnowburn Beeches. By Jayne Gregory Lagan Valley
An apple a day. By N Walker, Belfast
Redbreast, River Lagan. By B Maguire
Victoria Park, Belfast. By Glen Dunwoody, Belfast
High and dry. By John Hughes, Newtownabbey
Lovers Lane, Merville Garden Village, Newtownabbey. By John Hughes, Newtownabbey
Belvoir forest park on 9th January, by Clare Harvey
Minnowburn Bridge. By Diane McKeaveney
winter on the Lagan - taken on the bridge at McIlroy Park, Dunmurry. By Helen Millar
winter on the Lagan - taken on the bridge at McIlroy Park, Dunmurry. By Helen Millar
winter on the Lagan - taken on the bridge at McIlroy Park, Dunmurry. By Helen Millar
Mournes from divis. By n.walker/belfast
Daniel and Luke Kelly enjoying the snow in Glengormley. By Stephen Kelly
Snow shapes in the Mournes. By Paul Kavanagh, Rathfriland
Ollie in his first snow. By Ruth M.McKinley, Portadwon
Winter visitor to my back garden. Almost fell down trying to get my camera. By Martin in Banbridge
Two little visitors. By Thomas Braniff, Ballymena
Doing the post in Carryduff. By Liam Mackel, Belfast
Twirly Whirly. By Sinead Hoben, Newry
Riverside Park. By Andy, Ballymoney
Snowy days: Matthew and Owen Irvine , Maghaberry
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Frozen pampas grass in Botanic Gardens. By Feldore McHugh, Belfast
Zara, Lewis & Dylan with mum at Lurgan Park. By Gareth Crooks
Frozen playhouse. By Sinead Hoben, Newry
Grandson Caleb Patterson braving the slippery conditions to post some letters. By William McVeigh, Comber
National University of Ireland, Maynooth campus. By Helen McVeigh, Belfast
Ice on the River Bann near Coleraine. By K Rowland, Kilrea
Ice flows at Craigavon Bridge. By Alfie McAleer, Derry
Hikers along the Mournes Wall. By Paul Kavanagh, Rathfriland
Mournes in January. By Paul Kavanagh, Rathfriland
Royal Portrush frozen 3rd green. By Andy, Ballymoney
River Lagan. By B Maguire
John Mitchell, Mourne Mountains. By John Mitchell, Belfast
High Mournes over Silent Valley to the Irish sea. By Paul Kavanagh, Rathfriland
Frozen Lagan at Ormeau Bridge. By Philip McErlean
Victoria Park. By Elizabeth McQuillan, Belfast
Frost on tree branches. By Rach Co Down
Frozen River in Dunmurry. By Tierna Magee, Belfast
Snow over Belfast. By Lisa Kyle
CEF in the snow. By Lisa Kyle
Robin in cold snap. By Jeffrey Bingham, Banbridge
Tree at Lower Ballinderry. By George Glover
Cascum Road, Banbridge at sunset. By Gordon Mc Clintock, Banbridge.
Fat Robin. By Elizabeth McQuillan, Belfast
Frances Wilson on skis in Springwell Forest near Coleraine. By Peter Wilson, Portstewart
Waterworks Park. Submitted by Mary Torney, Belfast
Hillsborough Forest Park. Submitted by Jo Maguire, Lambeg
Missy on Ice. Submitted by Mary Torney, Belfast
Ballougry Road, County Londonderry. Submitted by Stephen Hogg, Ballymagorry
Overlooking the Minnowburn Beeches. Submitted by Geoff McConaghie
At the rose garden over looking Malone House. Submitted by Geoff McConaghie
Anna and Amy Smith on the ice at the Waterworks. Submitted by Mary Torney, Belfast
Hoarfrost on hogweed at River Bann at Gilford, County Down. Submitted by Ken Stewart. Lurgan
At the giants ring. Submitted by Geoff McConaghie
Under the Minnowburn Bridge. Submitted by Geoff McConaghie
Tildarg from Collin Mountain. Submitted by William McCullough, Glenwherry
While in our car. Coleraine Mountain Rd, Londonderry
A robin in the winter sun. Submitted by Derek Laverty, Lisburn
Strabane Lifford border. Submitted by Stephen Hogg, Ballymagorry
Banks of the River Foyle. Submitted by Stephen Hogg, Ballymagorry
Feed our feathered friends. Submitted by Derek Laverty, Lisburn
The best way to keep warm. Submitted by Derek Laverty, Lisburn
Foyle Railway, Londonderry. Submitted by Stephen Hogg, Ballymagorry
Londonderry. Submitted by Stephen Hogg, Ballymagorry
The Bann Bridge, Kilrea. Submitted by Brendan McAllister, Kilrea
The black bird has a rest. Submitted by Chrissie Carson, Dundrod
A tree on Lagan Tow Path, Lisburn. Submitted by Gary Boal
River Lagan. Submitted by Ivor Bradley, Belfast
Caption: Eoghan and Ronan, Cregagh Glen, Submitted by Bob McKeown, Belfast
Hillsborough Forest Park. Submitted by John Shaw, Lisburn
Swans and ducks in Enniskillen, Submitted by John Shaw, Lisburn
Minnowburn Bridge Belfast. Submitted by Trevor Woods
Mist rises over the hills of Dromara on Christmas morning. By Emma Bell, Dromore
Breathtaking views on a crisp Sunday walk at Murlough Bay (Jan 3rd). By Emma Bell, Dromore
Robin enjoying some hot porridge on a cold Christmas morning in Dromore. By Emma Bell, Dromore
hillsborough forest. By severine denis from france
hillsborough forest. By severine denis from france
Winter Landscape Glenravel County Antrim. By Donal O'Callaghan, Glenravel
This photograph was taken near Spelga. By Rosemary Cunningham driving to Hilltown
snow on barbed wire. By Rosemary Cunningham Spelga
Snow in the Kingdom, Co Kerry. By Éamonn ÓCeallaigh
Robin. By Paul Fryer Belfast
Looking over Belfast Lough from Loughshore Park
Looking towards Whiteabbey from Hazelbank Park
Loughshore Park looking towards Hazelbank Park, Whiteabbey
Ben, Christmas Day

Drivers and shoppers were told not to panic over feared shortages of fuel and food last night despite forecasters' predictions that arctic conditions would continue to grip the country for the whole of next week and beyond.

Although there will be a temporary easing today and a slight thaw, sub-zero temperatures and icy conditions are expected to return on Sunday, the Met Office said.

Downing Street said that while it could not guarantee that grit reserves would last, Britain was better stocked than at this time last year. Charities and the police, meanwhile, urged communities to look in on elderly or vulnerable neighbours during the cold spell after two pensioners were found dead in Cumbria.



Lillian Jenkinson, 80, is believed to have collapsed and frozen to death overnight in her back garden in Workington, while an unnamed man died in similar circumstances in Kirby Stephen.



A 57-year-old man who had stopped to help a stranded motorist was struck by a 4x4 vehicle and killed near Richmond, North Yorkshire.



Philip Hammond, the Transport Secretary, held an hour-long meeting with ministers and transport chiefs, where he was updated on the country's level of resilience, although the situation is not yet critical enough to convene the Cobra emergency committee. Caroline Spelman, the Environment Secretary, said that anecdotal evidence of empty shelves did not mean there would be real shortages. "The fact remains that deliveries are happening regularly," she said.



Drivers were urged not to panic-buy petrol and diesel by the Retail Motor Industry Independent Petrol Retailers' Association, which appeared to tone down its earlier warning that supplies were low in some rural areas. "As long as everyone behaves as normal there will not be a problem," a spokeswoman said.



Tesco said all its distribution centres were working normally and it had no plans to introduce rationing.



But some supplies were clearly not getting through. Hauliers said that thousands of lorries had spent the last week parked up, losing the industry millions of pounds, while ports experienced problems unloading containers.



Britain was also told that it faced a potential shortage of brussels sprouts. Chris Gedney, managing director of TH Clements & Son, one of the UK's largest growers, said: "If the icy weather continues it's going to be very difficult for us to get our produce out."



But once again it was rail passengers who endured the worst of the weather's effects. Few of those stranded on platforms or carriages overnight will have welcomed Mr Hammond's indication yesterday that he was not planning to fine rail operators for their performance over recent days.



"I actually think it would be better if we get Network Rail, the train operators and the Met Office working together to see how we avoid the problem in future rather than who we fine," he told ITV's Daybreak.



Once again, on Friday around a third (28 per cent) of rail services failed to run, with only 53 per cent of those that did operate running on time. Commuter services in the South-east, East Yorkshire and Scotland – where 200 passengers spent five hours on Thursday evening stranded near Forgandenny, outside Perth – were the worst hit. Eurostar is also operating a reduced timetable until Sunday.



Gatwick airport reopened after 150,000 tonnes of snow was removed from runways and aprons. The South Terminal has become an impromptu dormitory for stranded travellers and it will be several days before scheduled services return to normal.



The weather is due to take its toll on sport, with a number of top matches at risk, including Manchester United's away fixture against Blackpool.



In Kent, officers said that a woman who dialled 999 to report the theft of a snowman from outside her house in Chatham was "completely irresponsible". Police said she thought it demanded investigation because she had used pound coins for the eyes and teaspoons for the arms. The woman told the emergency operator: "It ain't a nice road, but you don't expect anybody to nick your snowman."



Cold comforts: How they keep warm around the world



Sweden David Landes, Stockholm



Life doesn't stand still when winter comes. The biggest problem is people forgetting to switch over to snow tyres, which you have to do by law.



The airport in Stockholm usually keeps running. The rail infrastructure copes, although last year there were substantial problems, with lots of commuter train delays.



We don't have heated roads, but we do have some heated bus shelters. One of the dangers in a Swedish winter is icicles – every year someone is killed by a chunk of ice falling off a building.



Top tip: Long Johns. There is a saying in Sweden: "Det finns ingen dåligt väder, bara dålig kläder." It means: "There is no bad weather, only bad clothes." Wear thermal underwear and you can withstand anything. A nice hat and gloves help too.





Norway Dyveke Nilssen, Bergen



As a winter country we always laugh when snow brings London to a halt, but we're just as bad. Our first snow was in October. It was chaotic and the newspapers were saying things like: "Will we never learn?" The main problem was that it was so early and people hadn't changed to winter tyres. Motorists were queueing up outside tyre-fitting shops. Norway is quite a small country and we don't have the same public transport networks, so we are much more dependent on cars.



Heated pavements are common in the centre of the cities. One of the big problems is frozen pipes, and electricity prices always go up in winter. This is a bad winter – Bergen is usually not so cold but this year it is already -10C to -15C.



Top tip: Anything woolly. Wear wool close to the skin.



Russia Miriam Elder, Moscow



Everything swings into place at the first sign of winter – well, as much as anything can swing into place in Russia. The minute it snows, the trucks come out and clear the streets. There are never delays at the airports – you can take off in February in -40C – and the trains always run on time. Life goes on.



Lots of people die from icicle injuries every year. There was a scandal last year when municipal workmen were clearing icicles from the city buildings and throwing the ice into the street, and smashing car windscreens. Around 300 people freeze to death on the streets each year.



Top tip: Layering and shopping. I wear tights under jeans, T-shirts under sweaters, and I hop in and out of the shops so that I keep warm.



Canada Paul Rodgers, Winnipeg



Dog sleds, snow-shoes and cross-country skies are strictly for recreation in Winnipeg, though the city is snow-covered from early November to late April and temperatures routinely fall below -20C. The city is well prepared. Heavy snow brings convoys of ploughs on to major roads in the middle of the night. Lesser roads take a few days to clear, though drivers will still use them. Cars are plugged in overnight, as electric heaters stop the oil from freezing.



The worst Manitoba blizzard I experienced was in 1986, with 30cm of snow, 90km/h winds and zero visibility. Drifts rose to several metres and tracked armoured personnel carriers were used as ambulances.



Top tip: The first lesson Manitoba children learn about surviving winter is: "Don't lick anything metal; your tongue will stick."



Iceland Hjörvar Sæberg Högnason, Reykjavik



Winters in Iceland are milder now than when I was growing up. You used to be able to guarantee a white Christmas, but not now.



We still get snow from January to March, though, and councils in Reykjavik and surrounding towns work round the clock gritting and salting the streets. Reykjavik is heated geothermally, including many of the pavements and some of the roads if they are on a steep hill.



We go to "hot pots", which are like hot tubs and big enough for several people. I can think of about 10 or 11 in Reykjavik, for a population of about 150,000.



Top tip: Cod liver oil. And the woollen socks that my 86-year-old grandfather knits for me for Christmas.





United States David Usborne, New York



New York swings into action at the first sign of snow like a well-oiled machine. The instant that snow is forecast, there are snow chains on all the buses, and they put snow ploughs on all the garbage trucks to help clear the streets. The schools have a "snow day" notification system and commuter trains are rarely affected as they have overhead lines.



It's not all good. Midtown Manhattan can get very slushy and nasty and the wind whistles between the skyscrapers.



Top tip: Long Johns from L L Bean.





Afghanistan Julius Cavendish, based in Kabul



It's very difficult getting around in winter – it snows, then it melts and everything turns to mud, or ice. When you're trying to travel around, you get filthy. Afghan homes are heated with stoves, or bukhari. In poorer homes, there will be only one bukhari. Around 1,500 people die of exposure every year – not because of drinking, because they don't drink, but because there is nothing in the way of a welfare state and people have a low life expectancy of just 42. In the mountains it can get as low as -50C and even in Helmand, which is low-lying desert, it is below -20C at the moment.



Top tip: Make sure you get plenty to eat and drink.

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