Belfast Telegraph

Saturday 27 December 2014

Brady slapped down after walkout

A court sketch of Moors Murderer Ian Brady who is appearing via video link at his mental health tribunal at Manchester Civil Justice Centre (Elizabeth Cook/PA)
A court sketch of Moors Murderer Ian Brady who is appearing via video link at his mental health tribunal at Manchester Civil Justice Centre (Elizabeth Cook/PA)

Moors Murderer Ian Brady was slapped down by the judge hearing his mental health tribunal after first walking out, then complaining: "I've listened to this ad nauseam."

The child killer even suggested a panel member had fallen asleep at one point during the hearing, taking place because he wants to be judged sane and moved from maximum security Ashworth Hospital on Merseyside, where he is being force-fed, to a prison, where he believes he will be free to starve himself to death.

The 75-year-old complained that he had heard all the evidence before as a criminal psychologist was questioned over several hours about his mental health.

At the end of Dr Adrian Grounds's evidence, Judge Robert Atherton, chair of the three-man tribunal panel, asked if Brady wanted to say something.

Brady, wearing dark sunglasses, a dark jacket, white shirt and tie, spoke in a low, gravelly Scottish accent. Many of his words were inaudible.

Referring to Dr Cameron Boyd, who sits on the tribunal panel, Brady said: "It even apparently lulls him to sleep."

Brady said he had left the tribunal for around two hours on Tuesday morning because the lawyers and the witness were going over old ground. "I've listened to this ad nauseam. I know it by heart," Brady said.

But Judge Atherton cut him off, saying: "We will hear the evidence. If we take the view someone is wasting time you can be pretty certain they will be told."

The tribunal, held in a room inside Ashworth and relayed by video to Manchester Civil Justice Centre, heard evidence about his behaviour inside the hospital. He only comes out of his room at night and shuns contact with others, partly due to his superiority complex.

But he also fears other patients and habitually carried a pen between his knuckles as an improvised weapon, until it was taken away.

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