Belfast Telegraph

Saturday 25 October 2014

'Capital flight risk' after a Yes

HSBC's Douglas Flint warned that a Yes vote in next month's referendum could leave Scotland's financial system in a "parlous state"

Uncertainty over currency in an independent Scotland could lead to "capital flight" from the country, according to the chairman of HSBC.

Douglas Flint warned that a Yes vote in next month's referendum could leave Scotland's financial system in a "parlous state".

Mr Flint, who describes himself as an exiled Scot, said the sterling currency union was an "anchor of financial stability" for Scotland.

Writing in a personal capacity in the Daily Telegraph, he said: "The alternatives to a currency union include a completely independent currency, passive acceptance of a monetary policy designed in London for the rest of the UK, or, assuming Scotland rejoins the European Union, eventual membership of the euro.

"In all these circumstances, the transition from the existing currency union would be complex and fraught with danger.

"At the extreme, uncertainty over the Scotland's currency arrangements could prompt capital flight from the country, leaving its financial system in a parlous state.

"This could, in turn, place enormous pressure on Scotland's future fiscal policies. Scotland would give up the benefits of being part of a larger fiscal union with the stability that offers in terms of scale, diversification and fiscal transfers."

Mr Flint said Scotland would face "an enormous challenge" to introduce its own currency, while an informal use of the pound, or "sterlingisation", would put " enormous pressure" on fiscal policy.

He said: "Monetary policy itself would be imported from the rest of the UK; Scotland would be faced with monetary policy implementation without representation - a very odd form of independence."

The three main parties at Westminster have all ruled out the Scottish Government's preferred option of a formal currency union between an independent Scotland and the rest of the UK.

Mr Flint said: "That decision is wholly consistent with the actions that have been taken in the aftermath of the financial crisis to minimise the risks to UK taxpayers from financial sector shocks arising in overseas and wholesale banking operations.

"It is also consistent with the knowledge gained from recent events in the eurozone, which have highlighted the challenges inherent in managing a currency union without political and fiscal union."

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Latest News

Latest Sport

Latest Showbiz