Belfast Telegraph

Wednesday 23 July 2014

Mania hoping to go home after scan

Auroras Encore in his stable with winning jockey Ryan Mania during a photocall at Craiglands Farm, Bingley

Grand National-winning rider Ryan Mania hopes to be home from hospital on Monday despite medics saying he must stay in for another 24 hours at least.

The 23-year-old suffered a heavy fall in a race at Hexham, Northumberland, the day after his shock win at Aintree on board the outsider Auroras Encore on Saturday. He was flown to the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle where a spokeswoman said he was in a comfortable condition and that he would not be leaving on Monday.

But his agent Bruce Jeffrey said the Scotsman thought he would be released after he has had a scan later. He said: "I've spoken to him in the last half an hour. He's in good spirits and is hoping to go home today. He's still waiting for his scan, which will hopefully be OK, and if it is, he will then be able to go home later today."

It was understood the jockey did not want to speak to the media from hospital. On Sunday night he tweeted: "Thanks so much for all the messages. I'm grand. Staying in hospital to get another scan tomorrow then should be home #highsandlows"

Mania was riding again for National-winning trainer Sue Smith in the St John Lee Handicap Hurdle when his mount Stagecoach Jasper came down early on the final circuit. Some 25 minutes after the race the jockey was still being treated on the track by doctors.

There was a delay to racing following the arrival of the air ambulance. Mania was conscious following the fall and was put into the air ambulance on a spinal board before being taken to hospital.

Paul Struthers, chief executive of the Professional Jockeys Association, tweeted: "@Mania450 is in hospital with friends and family. He's awaiting scan results. Fingers crossed not as bad as first feared. He thanks everyone for their well wishes. Further updates when we have them. #getwellsoon."

Mania received what appeared to be a kick between his shoulder blades and was described as very sore before going for further assessment on neck and back injuries. Clerk of the course James Armstrong confirmed Mania had been conscious and talking after the fall.

The Great North Air Ambulance said its aircraft based at Penrith, in Cumbria, attended and took the jockey to hospital in Newcastle with a flight time of just eight minutes. A spokesman said Mania had back and neck injuries which were assessed as "severe/serious" but he said his condition on arrival at hospital was described as stable.

Mania, from Gallashiels, rode Auroras Encore to glory and became the first Scotsman in 117 years to win the National.