Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 31 August 2014

Usain Bolt attack suspect tricked way into 100m final

A man is on trial accused of abusing Usain Bolt before the Olympic 100m final that he went on to win

A former trainee teacher used an out-of-date ticket to trick his way into the Olympic men's 100m finals where he screamed abuse at the Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt before hurling a beer bottle on to the starting line.

In a major embarrassment for Olympic organisers, a court heard yesterday that Andy Gill-Webb waved his expired ticket at guards to enter the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London. He then repeated the stunt to gain access into the main stadium, where he "mingled" with the Dutch Olympic team and entered a trackside enclosure where he taunted Bolt.

Mr Gill-Webb shouted at the sprinter: "Usain, I want you to lose. Usain, you are bad. You are an a***hole". He then threw a plastic Heineken bottle, which landed behind the Jamaican shortly before he went on to win the event, the court heard.

Mr Gill-Webb (34) was confronted by a Dutch judo competitor, Edith Bosch, then restrained by Games volunteers and arrested. In a revelation that raised questions about security at London 2012, Stratford Magistrates Court was told that Mr Gill-Webb "passed through several steps waving an old ticket in front of people". After the incident, police could not find a valid ticket on him.

Dr Robert Adams, a psychiatrist called as a defence witness, told the court that Mr Gill-Webb, of Milford, near Leeds, had not expected to get as far as he did. "He got into the Olympic Park and was in the Olympic Park for quite a while, and then he thought, 'I have got into the Olympic Park, maybe I can get into the stadium'," he said.

Robert Spears, a security guard who helped to bundle the defendant out of the arena, said he feared the 100m race might have been declared void because of the disruption. Mr Spears added: "At no time did the man try to explain himself, but he demanded to know who had won the race."

Rhiannon Crimmins, defending, said Mr Gill-Webb had bipolar affective disorder.

When arrested, Mr Gill-Webb claimed that he was the Scottish actor Alan Cumming and signed a police statement with the name "AJ Cumming". His lawyers insist that he was having a manic episode at the time.

Mr Gill-Webb denies intending to cause the 100m finalists harassment, alarm or distress by using threatening, abusive or disorderly behaviour, thereby causing spectators harassment.

The hearing continues.

(© Independent News Service)

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