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Cancer survivors cook up a charity treat... and kids get a slice of the action too

By Joanne Sweeney

Published 26/09/2015

Laura Meyer and Diane Dunlop at the cup cake sale at Campbell College junior school yesterday in aid of Macmillan
Laura Meyer and Diane Dunlop at the cup cake sale at Campbell College junior school yesterday in aid of Macmillan
The cup cake sale at Campbell College junior school yesterday in aid of Macmillan
The cup cake sale at Campbell College junior school yesterday in aid of Macmillan
Freya Brand made the most of the scrumptious treats
Patrick Holmes, Noah Johnston and Lorcan Cumming all made the most of the scrumptious treats

The power of cupcakes and friendship through adversity came together yesterday in a charity event with the sweet taste of success.

It was cakes and buns galore at Campbell College Junior School in Belfast - which went down a storm with all the day pupils and boarders.

Friends Laura Meyer from Belfast and Diane Dunlop from Dundonald - who are both recovering from cancer - baked 500 cupcakes for a major coffee morning and cake sale in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support.

Both were helped by the charity's nurses when they battled against their respective illnesses several years ago.

Along with the support of friends and mothers of children who attend the school, the pair hope to beat last year's total of £1,200 by raising around the £3,000 mark.

"I've made most of the cupcakes with a little help from Betty Crocker," joked Laura (48), who was diagnosed in 2012 with head and neck cancer.

"Today is really about women helping other women. I started off having a coffee morning for the charity at my home. One day I was the person raising money to help others, then four weeks later I was one of those who needed the help."

According to Diane, Laura is the real baker in the partnership.

Her contribution is helping to finesse the finer details of running the cake sale.

"We have mums baking for us, pupils bringing in buns as well as eating loads of them," said Diane (40).

The mother-of-two marks two years of recovery next month after developing breast cancer from the BRCA2 gene she carries.

She added: "Last year I could not have spoken about my cancer, so being able to do that now is a big milestone in itself."

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