Belfast Telegraph

Cold snap looms for UK but Northern Ireland will miss worst of it

By Amanda Poole

Northern Ireland is the UK region most likely to escape the worst of the bitterly cold winter weather that looks set to start to bite next week.

With the mercury plummeting and the possibility of snow, our thickest winter woollies and extra blankets will be required, but it’s our neighbours in Scotland, England and Wales facing the worst of the elements.

Our little part of the world isn’t going to feel in any way warm, but we are not drawing the short weather straw for a change, as Meteogroup forecaster Chris Burton explained.

The weather expert said that it will be feeling cold across Northern Ireland, but won’t be quite as chilly as in other parts of the UK.

“Colder weather is pushing in from the east his weekend,” Mr Burton said.

“It will affect Scotland, England and Wales, but I’m not sure that it will reach Ireland.”

The worst of the big chill coming our way can be expected at the start of next week, so scarves, hats and gloves will be a definite must have if you’re venturing outside.

“It is turning colder and the greatest risk of snow will be on Monday,” Mr Burton added.

“The front is coming from the west and as it meets colder air it could turn to snow.

“It’s not clear how much snow will fall, if at all.

“In Northern Ireland on Monday and Tuesday we’re expecting temperature lows of -2C.

“It’s not going to be desperately cold, but it will be colder than it has been recently.”

Meanwhile, the Met Office’s latest decadal prediction suggests global temperatures over the next five years are likely to be a little lower than predicted from the previous prediction issued in December 2011.

However, both versions are consistent in predicting that we will continue to see near-record levels of global temperatures in the next few years.

This means temperatures will remain well above the long-term average and we will continue to see temperatures like those which resulted in 2000-2009 being the warmest decade in the instrumental record dating back to 1850.

For more information visit www.metoffice.gov.uk

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