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Lady Clark, widow of top Orangeman and UUP MP

Published 10/11/2016

Lady Nancy Clark, who has died, was the widow of the late Sir George Clark, a leading Unionist and Orangeman. She was 88. File image
Lady Nancy Clark, who has died, was the widow of the late Sir George Clark, a leading Unionist and Orangeman. She was 88. File image

Lady Nancy Clark, who has died, was the widow of the late Sir George Clark, a leading Unionist and Orangeman. She was 88.

Nancy Catherine Clark was a member of the Clark family of Upperlands in Co Londonderry, who had been involved with linen production since the early 18th century. She and her elder sister, Patricia, and younger sister, Sally, married husbands who became knights of the realm.

Nancy and her sisters were educated at a pre-boarding school at Redhall, Ballycarry, Overton College in Oxfordshire, Manor House School, Armagh, and Wood Lodge in Annsborough. She was keen on sport and was a member of the Northern Ireland schools' lacrosse team.

In her early career, Lady Clark was secretary to a senior director of the then newly established Aer Lingus airline and helped with the design and modelling of the first air hostess uniforms.

She was given, in appreciation, several pairs of rare and expensive silk stockings, much to the envy of her sisters.

On February 15, 1949, she married George Anthony Clark, later the third Baron Dunlambert.

The first Baronet, also Sir George Clark, was a partner in the former Belfast shipyard of Workman Clark, an MP for North Belfast from 1907-10, a Unionist senator, member of the Belfast Harbour Commissioners and a Deputy Lieutenant for the city.

Lady Clark's husband, Sir George, was elected as the Ulster Unionist candidate for Dock in the Northern Ireland general election in 1938 and lost his seat seven years later.

A prominent Orangeman, he was Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge for 10 years from 1957, and from 1958 to 1961 he was Imperial Grand President of the Grand Orange World Council.

Lady Clark strongly supported her husband throughout his career, and until her death she was the Patron of the Ulster Women's Unionist Council. She and her husband ran their farm at Tullygirvan near Saintfield, and she was the founder of the Saintfield branch of Save the Children, a charity with which she was associated since the 1960s.

Lady Clark was a talented gardener and a keen fisherwoman. Until a couple of years ago, she spent a week salmon-fishing every year in the west of Ireland.

She had a long association with Saintfield Parish Church, where a service of thanksgiving for will take place next Tuesday, November 15, at 1.30pm.

She is survived by her daughter, Liz, son-in-law Nick, grandchildren Henry and Georgina, sisters Patricia and Sally, her half-brother, Christopher, and her half-sister, Joanna.

Belfast Telegraph

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