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Map to feature stone carved from each of Ireland's 32 counties

Published 15/06/2016

The County Tipperary Stone by Ken Curran
The County Tipperary Stone by Ken Curran
The County Mayo Stone by Dom Keogh
The County Donegal Stone by Paul Phaid
Stone Masons prepare the giant monument base for the worlds first stone map of Ireland at the Tr Chonaill Stone Festival
Stone Masons from across Ireland working on the Stone Map of Ireland for the Tr Chonaill Stone Festival in Glencolmcille Co Donegal
Stone Map of Antrim by Fergal O'Donnell
A Stone Mason prepares the giant monument base for the worlds first stone map of Ireland at the Tr Chonaill Stone Festival
The County Tyrone Stone by Lorcan Dunne
The County Wicklow stone by Seighean O Draoi
Stone masons prepare the giant monument base which is part of a map of Ireland carved from stone native to each of the 32 counties
The map will feature stone from all 32 counties of Ireland

A map of Ireland carved from stone native to each of the 32 counties will be unveiled this weekend.

The 15 foot vertical construct has been a year in the making, with stonemasons from across Ireland each asked to sculpt a decorative map of their own county.

The 32 individual pieces are being fitted together like a jigsaw to form a new monument at Glencolmcille in Co Donegal.

Called Stones Of Ireland, it is being unveiled at the annual Tir Chonaill Stone Festival in the area on Saturday.

Each stone mason was asked to carve their native county using natural stone of that region.

Louise Price, chairwoman of the Tir Chonaill Stone Festival, said: "We are overwhelmed by goodwill. It basically involved getting 32 native Irish stones from quarries across Ireland and then getting 32 volunteer stonemasons from their representative county to apply their expertise in carving.

"The logistics of this project was difficult but the whole thing is driven by camaraderie and a love of what we do."

Embellished with artwork, the various county stones depict myths, legend & emblems symbolic to each county.

All work has been carried out on a voluntary basis helped by donations of stone from quarries all over the island.

Stonemason Patsy McInaw, who is president of the festival, said: "The monument celebrates who we are as Irish people and celebrates this ancient art. It reflects a people united in their work not for private gain but for the greater good. I would like to thank our supporters and all the quarries across Ireland for their kind donations of native stone."

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