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Priest's impassioned plea as drug victim Amy laid to rest

By Kylie Noble

Published 01/11/2016

Friends and family walk behind the coffin of Amy Reid in Cookstown after Requiem Mass at Holy Trinity Church
Friends and family walk behind the coffin of Amy Reid in Cookstown after Requiem Mass at Holy Trinity Church
Friends and family walk behind the coffin of Amy Reid in Cookstown after Requiem Mass at Holy Trinity Church

A young woman who died from a suspected drug overdose was "small in stature, but big in personality", mourners at her funeral heard.

Amy Reid, who was 21 and from Cookstown, passed away on Friday - just days before her 22nd birthday.

She had been at a house party in the nearby village of Coagh.

Hundreds of mourners gathered at Holy Trinity Church in her home town yesterday morning to pay their final respects.

Addressing the congregation, Fr Gerard Tremer made an impassioned plea for young people to avoid risking their lives with drugs.

Fr Tremer recalled how, on Friday night, "everything went terribly wrong" when "a party became a funeral".

"To our young people here today, please do not take anything unless you are 110% sure what is in it," he said. "To those who may have experimented with drugs - you have played with death, you have played Russian roulette with your body."

Earlier Fr Tremer referred to Amy's "many, many friends and neighbours".

He welcomed those who were watching the Mass on the internet, some as far away as Australia, America and London.

He described Amy as "a bubbly young woman", adding that her small stature belied a big personality.

From childhood Amy "loved outdoor life" and was a member of the Beavers and Scouts, the priest recalled.

In later life her love of the outdoors played a large part in her career choice, working on a farm in the Cookstown area. Fr Tremer said Amy was often up early in the mornings for work and was "not afraid to work hard".

Family members presented a photo of Amy, a Tyrone GAA shirt and a wooden spoon that she had named Rodney, as mementos.

Fr Tremor added: "We don't know why Amy named this wooden spoon Rodney but it had great meaning to her."

He added that it showed her unique self, also seen in her choices of pets - including a turtle and a goat.

The GAA jersey was presented as Amy had a great love for the Tyrone team and had played Gaelic football herself.

The family asked Fr Tremer to express the dangers of drugs.

"They do not want another family to go through what they are going through," he added.

Following the service Amy was buried in Forthill Cemetery.

She is survived by her parents Gerard and Lorna, step-mum Roisin and siblings James, Ryan, Colm and Lucy.

Belfast Telegraph

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