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Robert Black's sick fantasies chilled me... and left some jury members weeping

By Deborah McAleese

Published 24/02/2016

Robert Black's police interviews were the most chilling and disturbing pieces of evidence I have ever heard in a criminal court.

Several members of the jury became visibly distressed as they listened to this evil serial child killer admit how he fantasised about abducting and sexually abusing young girls.

Black's graphic accounts of his sexual interest in young girls were given to detectives during three days of intensive interviews in 2005, as they investigated the murder of Ballinderry schoolgirl Jennifer Cardy.

Excerpts of those interviews were played to the jury at Armagh courthouse in October 2011 during Black's trial for nine-year-old Jennifer's murder.

The interviews played a crucial element in the successful prosecution and conviction of the killer rapist.

It was a female detective who finally made him crack during the interviews.

Detective Constable Pamela Simpson, who has since retired from the force, outsmarted the notorious paedophile after he refused to engage with her male colleagues.

Ms Simpson's interview techniques got Black to open up and he freely described his sick "fantasies."

"I'd be driving along and see a young girl.

"I'd get out and try to persuade her to get into the van and take her somewhere quiet," he told her.

Police believed this "fantasy" was a veiled confession to the murder of Jennifer.

In another chilling revelation, he recalled how a young girl once appeared close to his van. She was crying and had lost her mother.

Black told the police how there was no-one around and it would have been "easy" for him to have bundled the little girl into his van, but that instead he took her by the hand and walked her back to her mother.

Listening to these interviews took its toll on some jury members, who left the courtroom quietly weeping after the evidence had been heard.

Belfast Telegraph

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