Belfast Telegraph

Sword of Jacobite who fought King William on display at Orange museum

A historic sword once belonging to a Catholic Jacobite soldier who fought King William at the Battle of the Boyne has gone on display at the Museum of Orange Heritage in Loughgall.

The artefact, which is over 300 years old, was once belonged to Patrick Sarsfield, 1st Earl of Lucan, who played a major part in the Williamite war in Ireland, which was fought between the Jacobite supporters of Catholic King James II, and the Williamite supporters of Dutch Protestant Prince William of Orange.

Co Armagh Grand Master Denis Watson said Sarsfield's sword was a "tremendous acquisition".

"The County Grand Lodge of Armagh is the proud custodian of a significant number of items relating to the early history of Orangeism," he said.

"This Jacobite artefact is a major addition to our growing collection which belonged to or date to the period of William of Orange. It is tremendous to have an artefact from the period of the Boyne, relating to a leading figure from the other side of the contest between the two kings."

Patrick Sarsfield was part of an Anglo-Norman family and spent his life in Ireland.

Initially serving as part of the Anglo-Irish contingent of the French Army, he later accompanied James II to Ireland to serve in the Jacobite army.

After the war's end after the second siege of Limerick in 1691, Sarsfield led the Flight of the Wild Geese - an exodus of the Jacobite army to France where they continued to serve James II.

Sarsfield later served in Flanders and was killed during the Battle of Landen in 1693.

The Museum of Orange Heritage is supported by the EU's PEACE III Programme and on its website states that its aim is to "create understanding, education, tolerance, and mutual respect through two ‘shared space’ educational and resource centres which tell the story of the foundation of the Orange Institution as well as its traditions, development and place in British, Irish and World society".

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