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Panama Papers: Irish firm at centre of tax haven data leak keeping quiet

By Alan O'Keeffe

Published 06/04/2016

View of a sign outside the building where Panama-based Mossack Fonseca law firm offices are placed in Panama City on April 3, 2016. AFP/Getty Images
View of a sign outside the building where Panama-based Mossack Fonseca law firm offices are placed in Panama City on April 3, 2016. AFP/Getty Images

Efforts to speak to representatives of an Irish company at the centre of the Panama Papers controversy have been firmly rebuffed.

The Pegasus Trust, a firm which has used the services of Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca, is located in the unlikely setting of a residential address in Drumcondra, Dublin.

About 360 companies with recorded links to Ireland appear in the Panama Papers.

A third of these are represented by Pegasus Trust, a company offering services in relation to offshore locations such as the Bahamas, the British Virgin Islands and the Seychelles.

A Pegasus Trust spokesperson told the Irish Times: "The services we provided to these companies, and to Intertrade specifically, were of a company secretarial/administrative nature. We had no decision-making role in any of these companies, including Intertrade.”

The newspaper said that according to a client note in the leaked files from July 1998, the Pegasus Trust was “well versed in offshore matters” and provided “tax efficient structures/trust services to their clients”.

There is no suggestion of any wrongdoing by Pegasus Trust or any of its clients.

When the Irish Independent visited No 30 Botanic Avenue on Monday, a man in shirt-sleeves opened the door.

When asked if the company would comment on the Panama Papers story, the man briskly replied: "We gave a comment already. We'll be making no further comment."

He then abruptly shut the door.

There was no commercial signage on the modest two-storey house to indicate it had an office use.

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