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Israeli boycott Derry councillors told to hand over Apple iPads

Published 04/10/2016

Apple and many other technology companies use products manufactured in Israel. Many councils in Northern Ireland provide public representatives tablet computers to cut down on paper usage.
Apple and many other technology companies use products manufactured in Israel. Many councils in Northern Ireland provide public representatives tablet computers to cut down on paper usage.

A group of Northern Ireland councillors backing a ban of Israeli products have been urged to hand over their Apple iPads.

Derry City and Strabane District Council passed a motion to examine how to implement the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Campaign against Israel in support the people of Palestine.

However, one MLA has said that if the councillors are serious they should handover their Apple iPads.

Israel is one of the world's biggest producers of computer components particularly memory drives.

DUP MLA Gary Middleton told the BBC: "I think we all realise the huge role that the research and development sector within Israel plays.

"The iPhone I'm using, the iPads the council use, they all use components that come out of Israel.

"The motion has raised the serious issue of discrimination, I put the question to the first minister and she herself had been contacted by the Jewish community expressing their concerns."

However, Sinn Fein councillor Christopher Jackson, who proposed the motion, said the comments were "nonsensical" and "headline grabbing".

"The wording of the motion actually states that council investigate the most practical means of implementing the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) campaign," he said.

"The motion itself was symbolic and in my view it has been successful in raising awareness in the council area and elsewhere.

"Any attempts to try and link the BDS campaign with anti-Semitism is absolutely wrong," Mr Jackson said.

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